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Tag: Books Into Movies (1-10 of 54)

On The Books: Stieg Larsson basically was Mikael Blomkvist

Remember Mikael Blomkvist from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series? (He was played by Daniel Craig/Michael Nyqvist, depending on whether you watched the Swedish or American version.) Well, Stieg Larsson didn’t have to get very creative when he was writing that character because he was that character. In 1986 the Swedish Prime Minister was assassinated leaving the cinema with his wife. A few years later, a petty criminal was arrested and charged, but it was widely thought that the police bungled the investigation. Much like the Kennedy assassination, conspiracy theories swirled about what really happened. Larsson himself sent the police fifteen boxes of papers he said proved that the shooting could be traced to a “former military officer said to have had links with the South African security services.” What? Fifteen boxes?? That’s right out of a page of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. I love it. He was probably one of those guys whose office was spackled with photos stuck to the walls and lampshades with pushpins and yarn. [The Guardian]

After stepping down from his post last month, Ben Bernanke announced that he will pen a memoir about his time as Chairman of the Federal Reserve. I will only read this if Marjane Satrapi agrees to make it a graphic novel. [Washington Post]

In preparation for Wes Anderson’s newest fancy, The Grand Budapest Hotel, check out this article on Stefan Zweig, the Austrian author whose work inspired the movie. Zweig was a prolific and important literary voice during the 1920′s and 30′s, but as a Jewish Austrian he was driven out of Europe as the Nazi’s rose to power. Ultimately, his tortured life ended in a double suicide. He and his wife swallowed a bottle of barbiturates in a hotel room in Rio de Janeiro in 1942. Despite, Zweig’s sad end, his stories of “disastrous passion” live on. I got a sneak preview of Grand Budapest last week and it was amazing. You definitely don’t want to miss it. [The Guardian]

In case you missed this, a new low-sugar book has been generating some buzz in the public health community. Dr. Richard Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at UCSF, has a new cookbook out called The Fat Chance Cookbook with low sugar recipes that can be made in under 30 minutes. The New York Times did a Q&A to get some basics about his dietary philosophy.

On The Books: Tolkien almost cut love story from 'Lord of the Rings'

First it was Ron and Hermione, now Aragorn and Arwen?? A previously unpublished letter reveals the tricksy W.H. Auden tried to convince J.R.R. Tolkien to axe the romance between Aragorn and Arwen in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The illuminating letter is from 1955 and penned by Tolkien, who is complaining to his publisher about the struggle to complete The Return of the King. Tolkien laments that Auden views the star-crossed subplot between the mortal king and his immortal lover as “unnecessary and perfunctory.” Wow. Shoot me straight, Auden. How do you really feel? Apparently the poet was on Team Éowyn-Faramir. Considering the level of minutia that Tolkien weaves into the historical fabric of Middle Earth, you would think LOTR could support a number of love stories. If I know the second cousin, twice-removed of every dwarf in the Shire, I think I can follow two romantic subplots. I guess Auden was a purist though. One story of true love per series. It’s good to have standards. Thank God Tolkien didn’t take his advice. [The Guardian] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: National Book Foundation picks '5 Under 35' honorees; judge rules on Lance Armstrong memoirs

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What’s J.K. Rowling’s next project? Who are the chosen ones for the National Book Foundation’s annual 5 Under 35 awards? Is Lance Armstrong really going to lie in his memoir?

Read on for all of today’s books headlines: READ FULL STORY

'Silver Linings Playbook' author talks new YA novel, 'Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock'

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Silver Linings Playbook author Matthew Quick is at it again, this time with the poignant YA novel, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock. In the book (out now) Leonard Peacock brings his grandfather’s P-38 pistol to school to kill his former best friend, and then himself. But before he—quite literally—pulls the trigger, Leonard must say goodbye to the four people who matter to him the most: his neighbor, Walt; his classmate, Baback; Lauren, the girl he has a crush on; and Herr Silverman who teaches a class on the Holocaust at Leonard’s school. Full disclosure: you might need tissues to make it through Leonard Peacock, but even if you don’t, you’ll likely be touched by Leonard’s story. Here, Quick talks about his inspiration for the book, the movie adaptation that’s in the works, and the success of Silver Linings Playbook. Check it out after the jump.  READ FULL STORY

'Hunger Games' producers nab rights to 'Crazy Rich Asians'

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Crazy Rich Asians, Kevin Kwan’s best-selling comedic novel about an American-born Chinese woman who travels to Singapore to meet her boyfriend’s billionaire family, is heading to the big screen. Nina Jacobson’s Color Force, which produces The Hunger Games films, landed the book’s feature-film rights. “Crazy Rich Asians is that immersive page turner I am constantly searching for but so rarely find,” said Jacobson, in a statement. “Kevin’s writing took me into a world I’d never seen or imagined and got me so invested in the romance at the heart of it that I could not put the book down until I saw whether or not they made it. This novel represents an enormous opportunity for Color Force to tell a universal story to a global audience.”

In the novel, Nick brings Rachel home to meet his family, a nerve-wracking courtship ritual for any couple, but one that is complicated further when Rachel is confronted by his family’s opulent wealth and their over-the-top behavior. “It’s a story of three families and Nick is really at the nucleus of it,” Kwan told EW in June. “[Rachel] is our guide, our guide being that we are these western readers entering this new world. Even though she is Chinese, she is American. She thinks she knows what it’s all about, and then she goes into this world and discovers that all of her misconceptions and all of her perceived ideas of Asia are challenged.”

'Divergent' author Veronica Roth to release e-stories from Four's point-of-view

For Divergent fans that can’t get enough of Tris’s hunky love interest Four (real name, Tobias), readers won’t have to wait until the release of the third series installment or the movie to satisfy the itch. Author of the dystopian saga Veronica Roth plans to release four e-stories told from Four’s point-of-view. READ FULL STORY

'Mortal Instruments' movie tie-in editions: See all three! -- EXCLUSIVE

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For Shadowhunters desperate for more Mortal Instruments, Simon & Schuster has plenty of movie tie-ins and extras to tide you over until the movie version of Cassandra Clare’s best-seller The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones hits theaters Aug. 23. July 9 brings three new titles releasing simultaneously: The Official Illustrated Companion, Shadowhunter’s Guide, and the City of Bones Movie Tie-in Edition. EW has the exclusive first look at each of these giftables below. Get ready for a whole lot of demons, leather, and runes. READ FULL STORY

Watch the trailer for Leigh Bardugo's 'Siege and Storm' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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Siege and Storm, the second book in Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha trilogy, hits shelves in June. And if Shadow and Bone—the first book in the series—is any indication, Siege will likely be a huge hit. Shadow and Bone was a New York Times best-seller, and has been optioned by Dreamworks with David Heyman of Harry Potter fame slated to produce the film. But before Shadow and Bone lands in theaters, we’ve got the exclusive trailer for Siege and Storm. READ FULL STORY

Author and TV writer Maria Semple talks 'Where'd You Go, Bernadette', 'Arrested Development', and the 'Bernadette' movie

Where’d You Go, Bernadette, released in paperback today, tells the story of Bernadette Fox, a brilliant architect turned neurotic housewife who spends her days planning a family trip to Antarctica per her teenage daughter’s request. What results is a hilarious epistolary novel constructed almost entirely of letters and email correspondence. When Bernadette goes missing, it becomes her daughter’s sole purpose to track down her mother in this story about family, failure and bouncing back. The second novel from television writer Maria Semple, Where’d You Go, Bernadette, made a splash in the book world in 2012 and is now being made into a feature film. We caught up with Semple to talk about the book, the movie and everything in between: READ FULL STORY

Will Stephenie Meyer make 'The Host' a trilogy?

The big-screen adaptation of Stephenie Meyer’s The Host doesn’t hit theaters till March 29, yet there’s already chatter that the Twilight author might turn this sci-fi thriller into a trilogy.

“Once you’ve created characters that have life to them, unless you kill them all, you know where their stories go. You’re always aware of what happens next,” Meyer told the Associated Press earlier this week. “I’ve got outlines for the next books. I would hope that this would be a three-book arc, but we’ll see.”

Not so fast, cautions a source close to Meyer, who tells EW that there’s been no new news to report on the sequel/trilogy front. Besides, Meyer’s plate is pretty full at the moment — in addition to promoting The Host she’s a producer on the newly Sundance-acquired Austenlandstarring Keri Russell.
READ FULL STORY

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