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Tag: Books Into Movies (1-10 of 61)

J.K Rowling to publish piece about Dolores Umbridge on Pottermore

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J.K. Rowling is returning to the wizarding world to focus on one of Harry Potter’s most twisted foes.

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Is Harry Potter returning? Let's all try to decipher J.K. Rowling's cryptic tweet (updated)

J.K. Rowling sent Twitter abuzz after posting a cryptic tweet on Monday that seemed to suggest something was brewing in the land of Hogwarts.

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Judith Viorst talks 'Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day'

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It’s time for a trip down memory lane. If you grew up reading picture books, chances are you’re familiar with Judith Viorst’s Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Originally published in 1972, Alexander is one of those instant classics because, like the titular character, we’ve all had our fair share of terrible, horrible, no good, very bad days. Alexander’s hitting the big screen next month with Disney’s adaptation starring Steve Carell and Jennifer Garner. Coincidentally, \ Viorst has two new books (out now) leading up to the movie’s release: Alexander, Who’s Trying His Best to Be the Best Boy Ever and And Two Boys Booed, illustrated by Sophie Blackall. Here, Viorst talks about her inspiration for both, and Alexander’s lasting legacy. READ FULL STORY

Dark coming-of-age stories 'Heavenly Creatures,' 'Stand By Me,' 'Brick' and 'Young Adult' return to the big screen

“Those days are gone forever … I should just let ‘em go.”

No, Don Henley. To hell with that. Sometimes you’ve got to reach back to those glory days with all your might and pull them right back into the here and now — which is exactly what the American Cinematheque and your friendly, neighborhood EW writer are hoping to do with this weekend’s double-feature film fest Youth Is Brutal: Coming-of-Age Films.

Sinister tales of growing up (or not) make up this three-night event at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica, beginning on Friday with back-to-back showings of Peter Jackson’s haunting Heavenly Creatures (1994) and Stand By Me (1986), Rob Reiner’s classic adaptation of the Stephen King friendship saga.

Here’s a rundown of the movies returning to the big screen, with details at the bottom about how to win free tickets … READ FULL STORY

'Hi doggie!': Hear 'The Room' star Greg Sestero read from his memoir -- EXCLUSIVE AUDIOBOOK EXCERPT

When Entertainment Weekly first spoke to actor Greg Sestero back in 2008 the cult which surrounded his film The Room was still a small, mostly Los Angeles-based affair. Six years on, director-writer-star Tommy Wiseau’s fantastically awful film has become famous around the world and Sestero’s recent memoir The Disaster Artist – which concerns both the film’s production and his friendship with Wiseau — has been optioned by James Franco. READ FULL STORY

David Foster Wallace's estate opposes biopic 'The End of the Tour'

Relatives of David Foster Wallace say they’re opposed to the upcoming film The End of the Tour, which is based on David Lipsky’s 2010 book Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace.

In his book, Lipsky recounts accompanying Wallace, the author best known for his 1996 novel Infinite Jest, on his book tour.

Production on The End of the Tour, written by Donald Margulies, directed by James Ponsoldt (The Spectacular Now), and starring Jason Segel as Wallace and Jesse Eisenberg as Lipsky, wrapped in late March.

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On The Books: Laura Hillenbrand rewrote 'Unbroken' as a YA book

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Laura Hillenbrand has rewritten her best-seller Unbroken, the life story of Olympic runner Louie Zamperini, as a YA nonfiction book that will be published on Veterans Day (Nov. 11, 2014). The original Unbroken tells the tale of Zamperini’s Odysseian journey from a hard-scrabble kid in Southern California during the Depression to his meteoric rise as an Olympic runner in the 1936 Berlin Games. Later he signed up as a fighter pilot during World War II and flew planes in the South Pacific. His bomber crashed 850 miles off the coast of Hawaii and he spent 47 days stranded on a raft before being captured by the Japanese and brutally abused in a POW camp until the end up the war. But it’s not a downer! He perseveres and with the same buoyant spirit that carried him to the Olympics, he recovers from his wartime experiences and finds new life for himself.

I’m not sure why this needs a “YA” version. It sounds pretty appropriate for the 12+ ages of the “young adult” genre. Surely if you can be conscripted to read Lord of the Flies at 13, you can read this amazing real-life tale of the triumph of human spirit. Hillenbrand didn’t say specifically what she changed for the younger version, only that “Louie Zamperini’s story is spellbinding to people of every age. At the urging of librarians, teachers, and parents, I’ve created this edition specifically for younger readers. I’m delighted to bring Louie’s inspiring, exhilarating story to a new generation.” Since its original publication in November 2010, Unbroken has sold nearly 4 million copies and has remained on the bestseller list for over 160 weeks, with 14 weeks at #1. Angelina Jolie is directing a film adaptation (written by the Cohen brothers no less!) which is set for release on Christmas Day 2014.

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On The Books: Stieg Larsson basically was Mikael Blomkvist

Remember Mikael Blomkvist from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series? (He was played by Daniel Craig/Michael Nyqvist, depending on whether you watched the Swedish or American version.) Well, Stieg Larsson didn’t have to get very creative when he was writing that character because he was that character. In 1986 the Swedish Prime Minister was assassinated leaving the cinema with his wife. A few years later, a petty criminal was arrested and charged, but it was widely thought that the police bungled the investigation. Much like the Kennedy assassination, conspiracy theories swirled about what really happened. Larsson himself sent the police fifteen boxes of papers he said proved that the shooting could be traced to a “former military officer said to have had links with the South African security services.” What? Fifteen boxes?? That’s right out of a page of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. I love it. He was probably one of those guys whose office was spackled with photos stuck to the walls and lampshades with pushpins and yarn. [The Guardian]

After stepping down from his post last month, Ben Bernanke announced that he will pen a memoir about his time as Chairman of the Federal Reserve. I will only read this if Marjane Satrapi agrees to make it a graphic novel. [Washington Post]

In preparation for Wes Anderson’s newest fancy, The Grand Budapest Hotel, check out this article on Stefan Zweig, the Austrian author whose work inspired the movie. Zweig was a prolific and important literary voice during the 1920’s and 30’s, but as a Jewish Austrian he was driven out of Europe as the Nazi’s rose to power. Ultimately, his tortured life ended in a double suicide. He and his wife swallowed a bottle of barbiturates in a hotel room in Rio de Janeiro in 1942. Despite, Zweig’s sad end, his stories of “disastrous passion” live on. I got a sneak preview of Grand Budapest last week and it was amazing. You definitely don’t want to miss it. [The Guardian]

In case you missed this, a new low-sugar book has been generating some buzz in the public health community. Dr. Richard Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at UCSF, has a new cookbook out called The Fat Chance Cookbook with low sugar recipes that can be made in under 30 minutes. The New York Times did a Q&A to get some basics about his dietary philosophy.

On The Books: Tolkien almost cut love story from 'Lord of the Rings'

First it was Ron and Hermione, now Aragorn and Arwen?? A previously unpublished letter reveals the tricksy W.H. Auden tried to convince J.R.R. Tolkien to axe the romance between Aragorn and Arwen in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The illuminating letter is from 1955 and penned by Tolkien, who is complaining to his publisher about the struggle to complete The Return of the King. Tolkien laments that Auden views the star-crossed subplot between the mortal king and his immortal lover as “unnecessary and perfunctory.” Wow. Shoot me straight, Auden. How do you really feel? Apparently the poet was on Team Éowyn-Faramir. Considering the level of minutia that Tolkien weaves into the historical fabric of Middle Earth, you would think LOTR could support a number of love stories. If I know the second cousin, twice-removed of every dwarf in the Shire, I think I can follow two romantic subplots. I guess Auden was a purist though. One story of true love per series. It’s good to have standards. Thank God Tolkien didn’t take his advice. [The Guardian] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: National Book Foundation picks '5 Under 35' honorees; judge rules on Lance Armstrong memoirs

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What’s J.K. Rowling’s next project? Who are the chosen ones for the National Book Foundation’s annual 5 Under 35 awards? Is Lance Armstrong really going to lie in his memoir?

Read on for all of today’s books headlines: READ FULL STORY

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