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Tag: Barnes & Noble (1-10 of 11)

On the Books: Bidding for 'Psycho' typewriter starts at $25K

Junky old typewriters aren’t typically worth a fortune—unless the screenplay for a Hollywood classic like Alfred Hitchock’s Psycho was written on it. The 1959 faded green Olympia that Joseph Stefano used to adapt Robert Bloch’s novel into the screenplay for Psycho is going up for auction on Nov. 20—and the bidding starts at an exorbitant $25,000. At least it’s still fully functional, according to the lot description.

Psycho went on to win four Oscars and carve out a place in movie history with its iconic shower murder scene. Stefano’s most notable change from the novel was his decision to begin the movie with Janet Leigh’s Marion Crane, instead of killer Norman Bates. In doing so, “Stefano changed the drift of the audience’s affections, and changed film history in the process: it was the first time a leading lady had been murdered within the first 20 minutes of a movie,” writes The Telegraph.

British comedian Eddie Izzard is writing a memoir to be published by Blue Rider Press (a Penguin Group imprint) in Winter 2015-2016. The book will document his journey from performing on the streets of London to selling out standup tours and appearing in films like Ocean’s 12, Ocean’s 13 and Across the Universe. “Eddie Izzard’s brilliant, and brilliantly funny, narrative style lends itself perfectly to the printed page,” said Executive Editor Sarah Hochman. [GalleyCat]

Barnes & Noble has created B&N Sync Up, a program that will allow customers to buy the digital editions of select titles for $4.99 each after purchasing the print editions. The company has also expanded the services it provides to self-published authors. Nook Press Print Service will allow authors to “create their own print books and have them shipped to an author’s home about one week after placing an order,” reports Publishers Weekly.

 

On the Books: Barnes & Noble reverses decision to close Bronx store

- Barnes & Noble has reversed this week’s decision to close its Bronx branch, the only major bookstore in the neighborhood. Borough president Ruben Diaz Jr. led the fiery local campaign to keep the shop open, brokering a compromise between B&N and the the property’s landlord. Mr. Diaz told the crowd at a press conference yesterday that “this is more thatn just a bookstore… This is where kids read and broaden their minds and do their homework.” [The New York Times]

- The first-ever Kirkus Prize-winning authors were announced in Austin, Tex. last night. Writers Lily King, Roz Chast, and Kate Samworth took home the brand-new $50,000 prizes in the fiction, nonfiction and young readers categories, respectively. King’s novel Euphoria, the story of three intertwined rival anthropologists, stood out “for its perfect construction, its economy and originality, and its fearlessness.” Chast, a cartoonist for The New Yorker, won for her illustrated memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, the story of the last few years of her parents’ lives—also up for a National Book Award later this year. Samworth’s Aviary Wonders Inc. is a a strange, funny, dark young adult tale about a world where birds are extinct. [NPR] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Long-lost Dr. Seuss stories hit shelves

Horton-and-the-Kwuggerbug

A new Dr. Seuss book was published Tuesday, 23 years after the writer’s death. Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories is a collection of four previously unpublished short stories that Seuss wrote for Redbook magazine in the 1950s. The stories, discovered by Seuss biographer Charles Cohen and published by Random House, feature both familiar faces like The Grinch and Horton the elephant, as well as new characters like the titular Kwuggerbug. Theodor Geisel, the man behind the legendary pseudonym, died in 1991. [The Telegraph]

British fantasy novelist Graham Joyce died Tuesday at the age of 59 after a yearlong battle with lymphoma. Joyce’s publisher Gollancz, confirmed the news via Twitter: “Graham Joyce was a writer of huge heart. He loved people and his writing celebrated the magic of them. His books are a fitting legacy.” The multiple-time British Fantasy award winner was mourned on Twitter by fans and fellow authors including Stephen King, who tweeted, “Very sad to hear that Graham Joyce, a truly great novelist, has passed away. Too soon. Far too soon.” [The Guardian]

The nation’s largest bookstore, Barnes & Noble, experienced a 7-percent loss in revenue in its first quarter, ending in August—but managed to cut its net losses from $87 million to $28.4 million in the first period of the fiscal year. Retail CEO Mitch Klipper said that part of the reduction in declining sales is due to the ongoing dispute between retailer Amazon and publisher Hachette, as well as the popularity of movies adapted from young-adult books. B&N’s future revenues will in part be determined by its Nook Media ebook business and a new joint venture with Google, a book delivery system, currently being piloted. [Publishers Weekly]

Celebrity television judge-turned-author Judge Judy Sheindlin is giving away her new book for free. What Would Judy Say?: Be the Hero of Your Own Story is downloadable on Sheindlin’s website a PDF or e-book, free of charge.  On the site, Scheindlen—who collects a bigger paycheck than any other celebrity on TV, earning nearly a million dollars per workday—describes her book as “an honest conversation with women about what it really takes to get what you deserve out of life.” [Los Angeles Times]

 

 

 

 

On the books: Barnes & Noble reveals instant-print Espresso Book Machine

Bookseller Barnes & Noble is launching the Espresso Book Machine at three store locations, including New York’s Union Square flagship. The machines, which retail at $80,000 a piece, print books on demand—then collate, cover, and bind them in minutes for customers. [Good e-Reader]

Valérie Trierweiler, the ex-girlfriend of French President François Hollande, published a tell-all memoir last week. France’s former First Lady writes in detail about her relationship with the highly unpopular President Hollande, including the devastation she experienced after finding out about his highly publicized affair with French actress Julie Gayet. A senior Socialist politician said that the release of the book is “a mortal poison for François but also, perhaps, for a whole generation of politicians,” The Telegraph reports READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Barnes & Noble and Google team up for same-day shipping

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Barnes & Noble is teaming up with Google Shopping Express, a service that will let the bookstore provide same-day delivery to Manhattan, West Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Bay Area. The service will help the two compete with Amazon, which already provides same-day shipping in 10 cities in the United States. From Amazon, same-day delivery costs $5.99 for Amazon Prime members and around $10 for other customers. Users who have subscribed to Google Shopping express do not have to pay any additional fees for same-day delivery, and the service costs $4.99 for other customers. [The New York Times]

Nine hundred writers have signed an open letter to Amazon—to be published in this Sunday’s New York Times—asking them to stop singling out authors for “selective retaliation.” Amazon is delaying shipments of books published by Hachette, which they are negotiating contracts with. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Lena Dunham discovers Alice Munro

Lena Dunham wrote an essay about discovering Alice Munro for Zoetrope, the literary journal run by Francis Ford Coppola. “I came to Alice Munro after her Nobel Prize win, like a girl discovering Maroon 5 circa 2014 and deciding they are an indie band,” she wrote. “Because, new as I am to her, and sure as we all are that she is the queen of her form, I still feel that Alice Munro is mine. I am the perfect audience for her brand of quiet, seething feminism.” The essay is titled “Hateship, Loveship, Viewership, Readership,” riffing on the title of the Munro’s classic story “Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage,” which is reprinted in the magazine. [Zoetrope All-Story]

Barnes and Noble is splitting its retail and Nook operations into two separate companies. Though there’s no guarantee that the split will be successful, the company hopes to complete the process by the first quarter of 2015. As it is, Barnes & Noble isn’t doing to0 well—retail sales are down 6 percent this year, Nook hardware sales are down 45 percent, and digital content sales are down 21 percent. Earlier this year, Barnes & Noble announced that it would invest fewer of the company’s own resources into the Nook division and would instead partner with Samsung to develop a tablet. Hopefully, one of the companies will be called “Barnes” and the other “Noble.” [Publishers Weekly] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Little, Brown to publish Willie Nelson's autobiography, Amazon Publishing unveils 'Day One' feature

Today’s news includes confirmed deals for Willie Nelson and Morrissey’s autobiographies, while Amazon and Barnes & Noble unveil more digital features. Read on for today’s headlines: READ FULL STORY

Barnes & Noble to release new Nook GlowLight

Barnes & Noble Inc. is releasing a new Nook e-book reader for the holidays, while it evaluates the future of tablet computers.

Nook tablets haven’t sold well amid intense competition with Apple’s iPad, Amazon’s Kindle Fire and others. Barnes & Noble had a slim 2 percent share of the worldwide tablet market in the fourth quarter of 2012, but fell off IDC’s top 5 list this year. READ FULL STORY

Sex sells: Online retailers rake in profits with dirty e-books

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Minds might be in the gutter, but the sales of dirty e-books certainly are not. Book-selling powerhouses such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble are raking in major profits from the sleazier online titles and genres that readers can absorb behind the privacy of tablet screens.

In 2012, romance and erotica topped revenue charts with $1.4 billion in sales. However, the profit tactic has left the book retailers in one of those Fifty Shades of Grey areas. Despite the revenue benefits of the taboo genre, Amazon and B&N appear to be on the fence themselves in regards to the promotion of erotic fiction. A 2010 pedophilia guide sold on Amazon finally got pulled by the online retailer after the illicit subject matter sparked controversy. But in lieu of the book’s eventual removal from the site, Amazon released a statement shortly after defending its decision to offer the item:

Amazon believes it is censorship not to sell certain books simply because we or others believe their message is objectionable. Amazon does not support or promote hatred or criminal acts, however, we do support the right of every individual to make their own purchasing decisions.

The economics of erotica have never been a real question: sex sells. And maybe 50 Shades of Grey is to blame—the 2011 novel featuring a naive college graduate’s relationship with a BDSM-obsessed business mogul—as it sparked a more recent wildfire-like spread of naughty fiction fascination. But the levels of provocative seem to go way beyond the bondage/dominatrix realm; Amazon keyword searches reach the furthest ends of the sexual spectrum, including pedophilia, bestiality, and incest.

Although successful sales numbers might help disputable titles avoid a ban, they do not overpower the decision-making ultimately determined by retailer representatives. Both Amazon and B&N have appeared to strip their bestseller lists of several erotica books. As an alternative, erotic novels with warranting sales can appear in the top 100 online, a B&N spokeswoman told the New York Post.

Barnes & Noble announces its Apple and Amazon rivals Nook HD and Nook HD Plus

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Barnes & Noble deepened its inroads into the tablet market with two new devices unveiled yesterday in Manhattan: the Nook HD ($199) and Nook HD Plus ($269). In private presentations to the press, executives for the bookseller made frequent comparisons between the 7-inch Nook HD and Amazon’s Kindle Fire and the 9-inch Nook HD Plus and the iPad 3.

Both devices are available for pre-order today and will ship in November, in time for the Holiday season.

While the devices boast several tablet functions — including video, apps, e-mail, and web-browsing — representatives emphasized that reading is what B&N does best. The tablets are designed to facilitate one-handed reading better than its competitors, based on research into the average size of a woman’s hand. The devices promise to be the lightest tablets on the market; the 9-inch HD Plus weighs 20 percent less than the comparably sized iPad, and in fact is closer in weight to the 7-inch Kindle. The Plus offers 10 hours of battery life for reading and 9.5 hours for watching video. Both devices have expandable memory — up to 64 GB — but neither comes equipped with 3G, 4G, or GPS.

READ FULL STORY

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