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Tag: Awards (21-30 of 68)

2012 National Book Critics Circle Award winners announced

long-halftime-walk

The winners of the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Awards were announced last night in a ceremony at the New School in New York City. The award for Fiction went to Ben Fountain’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, which was No. 5 on EW’s list of best novels of 2012. See the full list of winners (in bold) and finalists below: READ FULL STORY

2013 Caldecott and Newbery Medal winners are announced

Awards season isn’t limited to those in film and television.

The American Library Association announced its own set of winners today for the best in children’s books.

The 2013 Caldecott Medal, which recognizes picture books, was awarded to Jon Klassen for This Is Not My Hat, a follow-up to his popular story, I Want My Hat Back. This Is Not My Hat is the tale of a small fish with a zealous attitude and what happens when he steals a hat from a larger creature.

The 2013 Newbery Medal for children’s literature was awarded to Katherine Applegate for The One and Only Ivan, which tells the story of an artistic gorilla that lives a caged life in a shopping center and hardly ever misses the jungle. But Ivan’s world is changed when he’s joined by a baby elephant that helps him to see things differently.

Even adults can appreciate the humor and creativity in these award-winning children’s books.

Read more:
10 Great New Historical Books for Kids
Great Books for Kids 4-6
Gary Ross: 10 Kids’ Books I Love

National Book Awards to add more nominees, maybe go 'a little more mainstream'

In order to infuse some excitement into the proceedings, the National Book Awards are going the way of the Oscars and Britain’s splashier Man Booker Prize by announcing a “long list” of ten nominees in the four competitive categories before whittling them down to the usual five finalists in each, according to the AP. More nominees will mean more books getting a boost from the attention, lesser potential for snubs, and perhaps more genre nominees in the fiction category. Another change: The judging panel will include critics, booksellers, and librarians in addition to writers.

National Book Foundation vice president and Grove/Atlantic CEO Morgan Entrekin told the AP that expanding the judging pool beyond writers will perhaps make the picks “a little more mainstream” and less likely to include “a collection of stories by a university press.”

Do you think “more mainstream” finalists make book awards more exciting, or will that defeat the purpose? A similar debate swirled around the Man Booker Prize when Julian Barnes won for A Sense of An Ending in 2011.

Read more:
National Book Critics Circle Award finalists are …
National Book Award winner Katherine Boo on ‘Behind the Beautiful Forevers’, ‘unsexy’ topics, and ‘American Idol’ recaps
And the 2012 National Book Award winners are …

National Book Critics Circle Award finalists are ...

long-halftime-walk

It may not be as famous as the Pulitzer or as remunerative as the Booker, but the National Book Critics Circle Award is high in prestige among writers and publishers. Among the 30 nominees in six categories are National Book Award winners Katherine Boo for her nonfiction work Behind the Beautiful Forevers and David Ferry for Belwilderment in poetry. Two of EW’s picks for best novels of 2012, The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson and Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain, are in the running in the fiction category. See the full list of finalists below: READ FULL STORY

Hatchet Job of the Year Award nominates the best, most scathing reviews

Scathing book reviews don’t exactly help get readers into bookstores, but they do help us avoid potential stinkers — and mostly, they can be really fun to read. The Omnivore‘s Hatchet Job of the Year Awards dole out honors to the most acid-penned critics and dishonors to the authors on the receiving end of the literary spanking. Last year’s prize went to Adam Mars-Jones for his (in my opinion, completely valid) take-down of By Nightfall by Michael Cunningham. Here are this year’s nominees: READ FULL STORY

'Seating Arrangements' author Maggie Shipstead on WASPs and exploding whales

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You know who’s cool? Maggie Shipstead, whose debut Seating Arrangements (EW grade: A–) won the Dylan Thomas Award for best novel by an author under 30. In the novel, two preppy families gather on a tony island off the New England coast for a wedding, which gets all that blue blood pumping when several members of the party have epic meltdowns, and the festivities become explosive — literally. Read on for insights on combustive cetaceans and the nomenclature and study of WASPs from one of the most promising breakout authors of 2012. READ FULL STORY

Goodreads users select best books of 2012 -- FIRST LOOK

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The annual Goodreads Choice Awards are basically the People’s Choice Awards of books. Users of the literary social network voted on their favorite books of the year in 20 categories, and this year, there were some surprises — J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy as best novel? — and some slam dunks (Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl for Best Mystery, John Green for Best Young Adult, and Cheryl Strayed’s Wild for Best Memoir). Once again, Veronica Roth proved that she’s pretty much unbeatable when it comes to reader-voted prizes, winning the Best Goodreads Author award for the first time and the Best Young Adult Fantasy award for the second time with Insurgent, sequel to Divergent.

The closest race occurred in Best Historical Fiction, with M.L. Stedman’s The Light Between Oceans narrowly beating out Man Booker-winner Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel. J.K. Rowling’s first adult novel most likely benefited from a large and devoted fanbase, as Casual Vacancy only became a finalist due to write-in votes — its Goodreads user rating of 3.32 stars wasn’t originally high enough to qualify it — yet it won the biggest honor.

Susan Cain’s Nonfiction win for her best-seller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking made me smile — partly because I could picture a bunch of Goodreads bookworms really relating to it, and also because introverts, a sizable but often ignored and misunderstood demographic, have had a big year in 2012 with the publication of Quiet, Sophia Dembling’s The Introvert’s Way, and a buzzed-about feature in The Atlantic.

See the entire list of winners below: READ FULL STORY

Bad Sex in Fiction Award: Which books beat out J.K. Rowling, 'Fifty Shades of Grey'

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Think you’ve had enough exposure to bad sex lit lately? (Ellen Degeneres, Kristen Stewart and your Facebook friends made sure you didn’t escape the abundance of Fifty Shades of Grey excerpts floating around the Interwebs this year.) Well, whether you like it or not, there’s more out there. A lot more. Award-worthy more.

But by award-worthy, I mean Razzie-esque awards. That’s right, authors are annually bestowed with the prize that recognizes gag-worthy writing about the bedroom. It’s an award that British magazine Literary Review started in 1993. On Tuesday, the magazine unveiled its 2012 shortlist for the Bad Sex in Fiction Award. Check out the list of eight finalists below:

The Yips by Nicola Barker
The Adventuress: The Irresistible Rise of Miss Cath Fox by Nicholas Coleridge
Infrared by Nancy Huston
Rare Earth by Paul Mason
Noughties by Ben Masters
The Quiddity of Will Self by Sam Mills
The Divine Comedy by Craig Raine
Back to Blood by Tom Wolfe
READ FULL STORY

Goodreads Choice Awards 2012 finalists announced

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Book nerds, you have some hard choices to make. The folks at Goodreads, the social networking hub for bibliophiles, have whittled down the field to 200 finalists — with 10 titles in 20 categories — for the Goodreads Choice Awards, voted on by Goodreads users.

In the Fiction category are some of the most beloved novels of the year, including Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan, This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Diaz, The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker … and The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling? Rowling’s foray into adult fiction didn’t originally qualify for the long-list because it didn’t get the required 3.5-star user rating, but it earned enough write-in votes to become a finalist.

Another category to watch is Romance. E L James’ reps point to last year’s Goodreads Choice Awards as the tipping point that gave Fifty Shades of Grey a new level of recognition that eventually led to the phenomenon we all know about. Fifty Shades Freed goes up against Sylvia Day’s Bared to You and J.R. Ward’s Lover Reborn.

You can always count on Young Adult literature to generate enthusiastic online engagement. In the YA fiction category, the front-runner is certainly John Green’s wonderful novel The Fault in Our Stars. The #DFTBA movement should give him the win handily, although the dark horse might be Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which won a lot of fans this year. (It’s terrific). In the YA fantasy category, it’ll be a battle between Veronica Roth and Cassandra Clare to see whose extremely devoted followings will turn out in droves.

Go vote!

Follow @EWStephanLee on Twitter.

Read more:
See the new paperback cover of ‘The Age of Miracles’ by Karen Thompson Walker — EXCLUSIVE
And the 2012 National Book Award winners are …
National Book Award winner Katherine Boo on ‘Behind the Beautiful Forevers’, ‘unsexy’ topics, and ‘American Idol’ recaps

National Book Award winner Katherine Boo on 'Behind the Beautiful Forevers', 'unsexy' topics, and 'American Idol' recaps

Last night, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Katherine Boo won the National Book Award in the nonfiction category for her first book, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity. We weren’t surprised at all by the win — Forevers is a stunning, must-read account of life in Annawadi, a Mumbai slum where unbelievable atrocities are an everyday occurence. Upon the book’s publication in February of this year, EW’s Jeff Giles predicted Boo’s book would be “a conversation starter, an award winner.” After a night of celebrating, Boo took the time to talk to EW about what it means for a difficult book like hers to win a major award — but before we could get into any of that, she had to get this out of the way: “I really like Annie Barrett’s American Idol recaps. They were like my therapy. I’d be tense over writing my book, and I was like, ‘I need to read Annie Barrett.’”

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You were up against some legendary authors in your category. Were you shocked to win?
KATHERINE BOO: I was surprised. I thought it would be Robert Caro [for Passage of Power]. And I think that Anne Applebaum’s Iron Curtain is a great book and Anthony Shadid, for anybody who is writing overseas, is a legend. So I was quite surprised. It’s a whole thing where you’re supposed to write a speech in case you win, and I thought that was kind of lame. [Laughs] I couldn’t do that. I was sitting there realizing, “Oh gosh, I should have written a speech.” READ FULL STORY

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