Shelf Life Book news, reviews, trends, and talk

Tag: Apple (1-7 of 7)

On the Books: 'In Cold Blood' case files to be published

- Since its 1966 debut, Truman Capote’s chilling true-crime classic In Cold Blood has been regarded as the original “nonfiction novel”—a revelation in literature that combined the factuality of journalism with the literary finesse of fiction. But a recent claim made by the son of the man who investigated the real-life murder case indicates that Capote may have taken more artistic license in writing the account than previously thought. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Millennials read more than their elders, study finds

A new study from the Pew Research Center has yielded some surprising results on Americans’ reading habits across generations— finding that younger people are actually reading more books than their elders. The data shows that “88% of Americans under 30 read a book in the past year, compared with 79% of those age 30 and older.” The fact that Millennials read more than older Americans contradicts the popular characterization of a generation more interested in social media and the internet than paperbacks and hardcovers.

Another unexpected finding is that Millennials are equally as likely as older adults to have used a library in the past year. Additionally, Pew found that 62 percent of younger people believe there is “a lot of useful, important information that is not available on the Internet,” while only 53 percent of older Americans believe the same. [NPR]

Yesterday, Kindle users were notified by Amazon via email that they were eligible to receive damages from August’s court settlement of the class-action lawsuit filed against Apple for conspiring to fix ebook prices. Users may opt to receive a check or account credit. [Publishers Weekly]

In other Apple news, court papers filed on Sept. 4 disclose that Apple shareholders have sued the company’s executives for their role in “ensnaring Apple in a multi-year anticompetitive scheme to retail price competition… in the electronic book (‘e-book’) market.”

Herbert R. Lottman, the American biographer of influential French figures, died on Aug. 27 at the age of 87 after losing a battle with degenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. He wrote landmark accounts of French artists and intellectuals like Albert Camus, and he served as the European correspondent for Publishers Weekly for over three decades. [The New York Times]

On the Books: Apple might pay ebook buyers up to $400 million

If Apple is unsuccessful in appealing its loss in last year’s ebook price-fixing case, it will have to pay consumers $400 million. In a previous suit, Apple was convicted of colluding with other publishers to fix the price of ebooks. Apple agreed to the settlement even though it plan to go through with its appeal. If the appeal is successful, the company will pay nothing; if it isn’t, well, a lot of iBooks users are going to be really happy. “The outcome would represent a consumer recovery of over 200 percent of maximum estimated consumer damages,” according to a court document.

Elmore Leonard’s unpublished short stories will be collected and published in one volume next year. [The Guardian]

The estate of Arthur Conan Doyle plans to appeal the recent ruling that put Sherlock Holmes in the public domain. It has asked the Supreme Court to delay the earlier ruling while it prepares its case. [Publishers Weekly] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Maya Angelou, Judy Blume sign open letter to Obama on standardized testing; Emily Dickinson manuscripts digitally archived

Today’s bevy of book news includes an open letter, another digital archive, and a retirement that’s up in the air. Read on for more top headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Apple to be monitored over deals with publishing houses; Amazon removes self-published pornographic e-books

iPhone-5.jpg

No prizes or major announcements today, folks — this morning’s books headlines feature major companies hitting snags with publishing houses, but there are plenty of other good reads online. Check out more of today’s links below: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Nicholas Sparks tops best-seller list; Apple applies for patent on e-book autographs

We’re ending the week mostly with a slew of updates on the top book headlines of the month. Check out today’s books news and more below: READ FULL STORY

NY judge: Apple conspired to raise e-book prices

Apple Inc. broke antitrust laws and conspired with publishers to raise electronic book prices, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, citing “compelling evidence” from the words of the late Steve Jobs.

U.S. District Judge Denise Cote said Apple knew that no publisher could risk acting alone to try to eliminate Amazon.com’s $9.99 price for the most popular e-books so it “created a mechanism and environment that enabled them to act together in a matter of weeks to eliminate all retail price competition for their e-books.”

The Manhattan jurist, who did not determine damages, added: “The evidence is overwhelming that Apple knew of the unlawful aims of the conspiracy and joined the conspiracy with the specific intent to help it succeed.”

Apple spokesman Tom Neumayr said the Cupertino, Calif.-based company planned to appeal.

“Apple did not conspire to fix e-book pricing and we will continue to fight against these false accusations,” he said. “We’ve done nothing wrong.”

Assistant Attorney General Bill Baer called the ruling “a victory for millions of consumers who choose to read books electronically.”
READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Books

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP