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Tag: Amazon (21-30 of 68)

On the Books: Debut novel bought by Scott Rudin finds publisher for a $2 million contract

A first-time novelist struck gold with a staggering publishing deal, as well as a film in the works. Meanwhile, Malala Yousafzai’s book has unsurprisingly been banned in Pakistan, and stateside, the U.S. Postal Service worked out a deal with Amazon to deliver packages on Sundays. Read on for more book news:

Knopf has won the rights to Garth Risk Hallberg’s debut novel, City on Fire, for a whopping nearly $2 million. The novel, which already scored a film deal with The Social Network producer Scott Rudin, comes in at 900 pages and ignited a furious battle between dozens of publishers. [New York Times]

Malala Yousafzai’s I Am Malala has been banned in Pakistan’s private schools for “content which is against our country’s ideology and Islamic values,” Kashif Mirza, chairman of All Pakistan Private Schools Federation, told the AFP. [NPR]

The U.S. Postal Service is partnering with Amazon to deliver packages on Sundays. The deal is limited to Los Angeles and New York, but service will expand to other cities next year.  [New York Times]

Threshold Editions announced Friday it is halting publication of Dylan Davies’ The Embassy House: The Explosive Eyewitness Account of the Libyan Embassy Siege by the Soldier Who Was There, a book about last year’s attack in Benghazi, Libya, after doubts emerged about whether Davies had witnessed the raid. [AP]

J.K. Rowling says she will “never top Harry Potter” in an interview. “As far back as 2000 I knew perfectly well that I would never top Harry Potter. I knew that before the series ended,” she says. “But what do I love doing? I love writing, so clearly I’m going to continue to write.” [The Telegraph]

S.E. Hinton has been known to be private and media-averse, but the Outsiders author is on Twitter, happily tweeting her thoughts. Jon Michaud explores what it means for the author to participate in the “Twitter age.” [The New Yorker]

Publishers Weekly unveiled its list of the Best Children’s Books of 2013. [Publishers Weekly]

Here’s a no-guilt guide to putting down a bad book. [The Globe and Mail]

On the Books: Indie bookstores reject Amazon Kindle exchange program

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Amazon’s latest effort to push Kindles through indie bookstores has not been well-received. Meanwhile, NaNoWriMo is in full swing, with a new take by grammar site Grammarly. Read on for more of today’s top books headlines: READ FULL STORY

Amazon picks its 10 best books of 2013

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Only a week into November, Amazon has already called its picks for best books of 2013. Some of the choices are bold, some are expected, but decide for yourself whether Amazon’s faves will make your holiday list. EW’s list is coming shortly, so stay tuned! READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Orson Scott Card to write more 'Ender's Game' books; Mia Couto wins Neustadt Prize

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Which series will see new installments? Who won top honors in the literary world this week? Those answers and more headlines below: READ FULL STORY

Jeff Bezos' wife gives Amazon book a one-star review

The wife of Jeff Bezos is giving a thumbs-down to a recent book about her husband’s company, Amazon.com Inc.

On Monday, MacKenzie Bezos posted a one-star review on the Amazon page for Brad Stone’s The Everything Store, which came out last month and has been received positively by critics and Amazon readers. Bezos wrote that the book was filled with inaccuracies and biased against her husband and Amazon. Spokeswoman Sarah Gelman of Seattle-based Amazon confirmed that the review was indeed written by MacKenzie Bezos.

“While numerous factual inaccuracies are certainly troubling in a book being promoted to readers as a meticulously researched definitive history, they are not the biggest problem here,” Bezos wrote. “The book is also full of techniques which stretch the boundaries of non-fiction, and the result is a lopsided and misleading portrait of the people and culture at Amazon.”

Stone, who authored the book, is a senior writer for Bloomberg Businessweek. As of Monday evening, his book ranked No. 109 on Amazon’s best seller list. The Everything Store is being billed as a rare look inside a “corporate culture of relentless ambition and secrecy,” a portrait Bezos is strongly disputing.

On the Books: Diana Nyad to write memoir; Rand Paul accused of plagiarism

This week’s books news starts off with a new memoir, a plagiarism accusation, and a hefty donation. Read on for the headlines:

Swimmer Diana Nyad, the 64-year-old who successfully swam from Cuba to Florida, will be writing a memoir for Knopf. “Her book will tell the story of an epic journey, and a quest, in the ocean and on land, to live life at the highest level,” said executive editor Jordan Pavlin in a press release. “Nyad is a tremendous spirit with a message for the world.”

Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul has been accused of plagiarizing not only Wikipedia but from the Heritage Foundation for his book Government Bullies. “I take it as an insult,” Paul said in response to the Wikipedia accusations. “I will not lie down and say people can call me dishonest, misleading or misrepresenting.” [Buzzfeed]

The winner of the U.K.’s Samuel Johnson Prize, worth £20,000, will be awarded tonight. Six titles are on the shortlist, including Charles Moore’s biography of Margaret Thatcher. [The Telegraph]

What’s on your bookshelf? Capitol One Bank announced it will donate 50,000 books to schools in the U.S. through its Investing for Good project. [LA Times]

It’s November, which means it’s NaNoWriMo time — or National Novel Writing month for the uninitiated. To participate, simply write a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, so ready, set, write! [USA Today]

In an op-ed, Felix Salmon asks whether Amazon is actually bad for publishers, given all the controversy surrounding Jeff Bezos, the company’s publishing guidelines, and the ongoing debate about the merit of e-books. [Reuters]

Not a must-read, but might be worth a quick look: the Jacket Party tumblr, whose user alters book covers to display “hidden” (sometimes NSFW) messages. [Tumblr]

On the Books: Amazon launches Kindle First feature

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More Amazon news: The company launched program called Kindle First today, offering users access to Kindle books a month before their official release. Editors select the titles that will be available in advance along with a note of recommendation. [Amazon] READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Little, Brown to publish Willie Nelson's autobiography, Amazon Publishing unveils 'Day One' feature

Today’s news includes confirmed deals for Willie Nelson and Morrissey’s autobiographies, while Amazon and Barnes & Noble unveil more digital features. Read on for today’s headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: R.L. Stine to revive 'Fear Street'; Arizona school district lifts book ban

Not a whole lot of books news today, folks — just a Halloween-appropriate announcement from Chief Scarer R.L. Stine, a lifted books ban in Arizona, and an ad campaign that’s both confusing and fascinating. Read on for today’s headlines:

R.L. Stine, the mastermind behind the Goosebumps books, is reviving the young adult horror series Fear Street. [The New York Times]

An Arizona school district has lifted its ban on seven Mexican-American studies books after a governing board voted 3-2 to reinstate them as “supplementary materials.” [Arizona Daily Star]

The ad campaign for the upcoming film adaptation of The Book Thief is intentionally left blank. The film’s ad took up two consecutive blank pages in The New York Times with only a URL listed at the bottom. [Adweek]

Larry Kirshbaum, head of Amazon Publishing, announced he’ll be stepping down early next year. [Publishers Weekly]

Speaking of Amazon (we’re always speaking of Amazon), a community of Goodreads users have been protesting Amazon’s new rules. [Salon]

The New York Times is doing a series of profiles of small poetry presses because “many smart people say they’re panic-stricken by poetry, as if it were an iambic migraine to be ducked.” [The New York Times]

Q&A of the day: Rosalind Wiseman introduced the term “mean girls” with Queen Bees & Wannabes. She has a new book coming out titled Masterminds & Wingmen and talked to USA Today about what’s going on in “Boy World.” [USA Today]

And for your must-read: What’s that word again? Liesl Schillinger’s new book, Wordbirds: An Irreverent Lexicon for the 21st Century, provides an updated list of terms for every situation, from “Facebook-happy” to “rotter.” [The New Yorker]

On the Books: Maya Angelou, Judy Blume sign open letter to Obama on standardized testing; Emily Dickinson manuscripts digitally archived

Today’s bevy of book news includes an open letter, another digital archive, and a retirement that’s up in the air. Read on for more top headlines: READ FULL STORY

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