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Tag: Amazon (21-30 of 81)

On the Books: Do you want to die in the next 'Game of Thrones' novel?

If you know anything about Game of Thrones, you know that author George R.R. Martin kills off a lot of characters. If you’d like to join that esteemed company, here’s your chance. Martin is offering the opportunity to “meet a grisly death” in the next Song of Ice and Fire novel if you donate $20,000 to a fundraiser for the Wild Wolf Spirit sanctuary in New Mexico and The Food Depot of Santa Fe. You’ll be able to choose your position in the world (knight, peasant, whore, lady, etc) as well. But hurry! Offer only good while supplies last. Only one male and one female character are available. Other awards including sharing a breakfast with Martin, tickets to the show’s season 5 premiere, and even Martin’s hat. [Prizeo]

Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins will soon be joining the fray in the Amazon-Hachette war. According to Bloomberg News, their contracts are up for renewal next. This means that Amazon will be up against bigger arms — the publishers’ respective owners are News Corp. and CBS Corp. It also means that Veronica Roth and Stephen King will join J.K. Rowling and James Patterson in the controversy. Independent bookstore owners have also started yelling battle cries — the American Booksellers Association made digital banners reading, “Thanks, Amazon, the indies will take it from here,” “Independent bookstores sell books from all publishers. Always,” and “Pre-order and buy Hachette titles today.” Among all this, Hachette is laying off 3 percent of its staff. [Bloomberg]

Debut novelist Eimar McBride won the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction, one of the most highly regarded prizes in English-language literature. You might have heard of it when it was called the Orange Prize, sponsored by the British telecom company Orange, but it switched names and sponsorship this year. The book, A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing, beat out Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah for the award, as well as four other novels on the shortlist. “I hope it will serve as an incentive to publishers everywhere to take a look at difficult books and think again,” McBride said at the ceremony. “We are all writers but we are all readers first. There is a contract between publishers and readers which must be honoured, readers can not be underestimated.” [The Guardian]

In honor of the upcoming World Cup, the curator of Brazilian literature festival FlipSide, Ángel Gurría-Quintana, gives a rundown of the country’s literature — and there’s plenty of it. “Despite the common complaint that not enough Brazilian literature is published in English,” Gurría-Quintana writes. “This is an auspicious moment for new Brazilian writing in translation.” [The Guardian]

Stephen Colbert gives Amazon the finger

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“I’m not just mad at Amazon, I’m mad prime,” said Stephen Colbert on his show last night.

That was just the first in a barrage of zingers against Amazon, which is currently in a legal battle with Colbert’s publisher Hachette Book Group over sharing profits. Colbert put Amazon and CEO Jeff Bezos on blast for what many see as bullying tactics to make Hachette titles difficult to order, such as eliminating discounts and delaying shipments. “If you ordered Hachette’s 21-Day Weight Loss Kickstart, by the time it arrives, you’re still fat,” Colbert joked. The rant culminated in Colbert pulling two middle fingers out of an Amazon package and declaring, “Watch out, Bezos, because this means war.”

Joking aside, Colbert is taking real action against the corporation by encouraging readers to slap “I didn’t buy it on Amazon” stickers on books. And after plugging debut novel California by Edan Lepucki, the title shot to number one at the indie bookstore Powell’s in Portland.

Watch the video below: READ FULL STORY

On The Books: BookExpo to feature Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, Amy Poehler

The annual publishing convention BookExpo America began Wednesday at New York City’s Javits Convention Center. The four-day-long event will feature appearances from Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, and Amy Poehler, all of whom are promoting their forthcoming memoirs: Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography (Oct. 14), Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl (Oct. 7), and Poehler’s Yes Please (Oct. 28); other events include previews and discussions of film adaptations. EW’s YA expert Sara Vilokmerson is moderating The Fault in Our Stars event with author John Green and director Josh Boone, and EW’s Anthony Breznican  is moderating the This Is Where I Leave You panel with author Jonathan Tropper and actors Tina Fey and Jason Bateman. In addition to these star-studded events, the first-ever BookCon, modeled on ComicCon, will take place on the final day of BookExpo – organizers expect as many as 10,000 readers to attend. We can expect that the ongoing battle between Amazon and Hachette books will be a topic of discussion during BookExpo. [USA Today] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Hachette Amazon feud escalates, affecting Rowling and Connelly

The feud between Hachette Book Group and Amazon has intensified. The Los Angeles Times reports that Amazon has taken the pre-order buttons off of big Hachette titles, like The Burning Room by Michael Connelly and The Silkworm by Richard Galbraith, the pen name for J.K. Rowling. This is in addition to allegedly extending back order times for popular books, like Tina Fey’s Bossypants and Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point. Hachette has issued a statement saying they are “sparing no effort and exploring all options” to resolve this conflict, but Amazon has declined to comment. Hachette author James Patterson has been very outspoken about this battle. “What I don’t understand about this particular battle tactic is how it is in the best interest of Amazon customers,” he wrote on his Facebook page. “It certainly doesn’t appear to be in the best interest of authors.” READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Publisher accuses Amazon of deliberately delaying shipments of books

The publishing house Hachette Book Group has accused Amazon of deliberately delaying shipments of their books as a negotiation tactic to pressure the publisher into giving Amazon more favorable terms. Amazon has reportedly been marking many books published by Hachette as not available for at least two or three weeks. Titles by Malcolm Gladwell and J.D. Salinger are being delayed. Stephen Colbert’s America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t is listed as three weeks away, while James Patterson’s Alex Cross, Run is listed as a five-week wait. The New York Times reports that over the years Amazon has employed a number of ruthless tactics against publishing houses, even removing the “buy” buttons from some books! [New York Times] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Anne Rice stands up to haters on Amazon

Anne Rice, defender of vampire erotica, Christian lit and gothic New Orleans, has come out against haters who trash authors on Amazon.com. I love Anne Rice. I love her steamy fantasy. I love that she jumps in and out of the Catholic Church like it’s a swimming pool. What a treasure. Her house tour in NOLA is on my bucket list. Rice is miffed by the “bullies, trolls, jerks or whatever you call them” that abuse authors in the comments section of Amazon. She has signed a petition to require identity verification from commenters. On her Facebook page, Rice says “Amazon is such a wonderful system and so many go there to offer heartfelt authentic customer reviews of the books they read; too bad that the anti-author bullies have misused and abused anonymity there for their endless preying on writers. They are a tiny minority, true, but to the authors they harass and torment and endlessly attack, they are no joking matter.” I don’t know that identity verification would be progress, but it’s a good idea to draw attention to the issue of cyber-bullying writers. [Guardian]

This month’s fiction podcast on The New Yorker’s website is a chilling tale by Mary Gaitskill called “The Other Place,” chosen and read by the author Jennifer Egan. Egan was struck by the story’s “intense menace mixed with other kinds of complicated humanity, specifically parenthood and redemption.” A father is watching his son develop the same magnetism to evil and fascination with hurting women that he has curdling inside him. The father is troubled by this and he reflects on his own experience trying to quell this darkness. Creepy, and very stirring. [The New Yorker]

Hanif Kureishi, the author of The Buddha of Suburbia and my new favorite truth-teller, spewed out a rant against creative writing students despite his actually being a creative writing professor at Kingston University in the UK. “A lot of them [students] don’t really understand,” said Kureishi. “It’s the story that really helps you. They worry about the writing and the prose and you think: ‘F— the prose, no one’s going to read your book for the writing, all they want to do is find out what happens in the story next.’ ” How do I audit this class? [Guardian]

On the Books: Hugh Howey to publish Kurt Vonnegut-inspired book

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Today’s top headlines include authors adapting from previous works, as well as some e-book related news and notable deaths. Read on for more: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Amazon unveils best-selling books of 2013; Lindsay Lohan allegedly writing tell-all

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We’re starting the week with a round-up of the best-selling books, news on a possible book by “celebrity” Lindsay Lohan, as well as a forthcoming actual celebrity self-help book that’s (gasp!) not by Gwyneth Paltrow. Read on for today’s top headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Jane Austen portrait sells for $270,000; federal judge dismisses booksellers' lawsuit against publishers

Wednesday’s books headlines includes the selling of Jane Austen portrait, an end to the legal battle between indie booksellers and publishing houses, and some bad news for Mike Tyson. Read on for those stories and more below: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Amazon finds indie booksellers make up a quarter of top Kindle Direct Publishing ebook sales

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Good news for indie booksellers: They’re making a dent in Amazon’s Top 100 ebooks sold on the Amazon Kindle. Meanwhile, Norway is making steps toward digitizing all books in the 20th century. More on those stories and other top headlines below:

Amazon revealed a quarter of the top 100 Kindle ebook sales — through Kindle Direct Publishing — in the U.S. were by self-publishing indie authors and publishers. [The Guardian]

The National Library of Norway has been digitizing every book published in Norwegian since 2006 and will finish doing so in the next two to three decades. Anyone in Norway will eventually have access to all 20th century works, including those under copyright, writes The Atlantic‘s Alexis C. Madrigal. [The Atlantic]

Writer José Esteban Muñoz, known for his studies on queer theory, gender, and sexuality, has died at age 46. [The University of Minnesota Press]

Baltimore has become “The City That Reads,” with about 160,000 children’s books being distributed free to the city’s schoolteachers this week. [Baltimore Sun]

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America named sci-fi author Samuel R. Delany the grandmaster for 2013. Delany will be presented with the award at the Nebula Awards in 2014. [LA Times]

Collections of artful accidents in Google Books scans have cropped up online. Kenneth Goldsmith examines their appearances. [The New Yorker]

This year’s National Book Award winner for fiction James McBride talked how he writes, where he writes, and what he does when he’s rewriting. [The Daily Beast]

Looking for a gift for a young reader? Check out this list of holiday-friendly children’s books. [USA Today]

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