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Tag: Amazon (21-30 of 73)

On the Books: Jane Austen portrait sells for $270,000; federal judge dismisses booksellers' lawsuit against publishers

Wednesday’s books headlines includes the selling of Jane Austen portrait, an end to the legal battle between indie booksellers and publishing houses, and some bad news for Mike Tyson. Read on for those stories and more below: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Amazon finds indie booksellers make up a quarter of top Kindle Direct Publishing ebook sales

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Good news for indie booksellers: They’re making a dent in Amazon’s Top 100 ebooks sold on the Amazon Kindle. Meanwhile, Norway is making steps toward digitizing all books in the 20th century. More on those stories and other top headlines below:

Amazon revealed a quarter of the top 100 Kindle ebook sales — through Kindle Direct Publishing — in the U.S. were by self-publishing indie authors and publishers. [The Guardian]

The National Library of Norway has been digitizing every book published in Norwegian since 2006 and will finish doing so in the next two to three decades. Anyone in Norway will eventually have access to all 20th century works, including those under copyright, writes The Atlantic‘s Alexis C. Madrigal. [The Atlantic]

Writer José Esteban Muñoz, known for his studies on queer theory, gender, and sexuality, has died at age 46. [The University of Minnesota Press]

Baltimore has become “The City That Reads,” with about 160,000 children’s books being distributed free to the city’s schoolteachers this week. [Baltimore Sun]

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America named sci-fi author Samuel R. Delany the grandmaster for 2013. Delany will be presented with the award at the Nebula Awards in 2014. [LA Times]

Collections of artful accidents in Google Books scans have cropped up online. Kenneth Goldsmith examines their appearances. [The New Yorker]

This year’s National Book Award winner for fiction James McBride talked how he writes, where he writes, and what he does when he’s rewriting. [The Daily Beast]

Looking for a gift for a young reader? Check out this list of holiday-friendly children’s books. [USA Today]

On the Books: Tom Clancy's 'Jack Ryan' franchise may continue; 'Catfish' host Nev Schulman lands book deal

It’s quite a Wednesday for book news — today’s top stories feature Jack Ryan, Catfish, and bad sex. Read on for more headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Jennie Garth to publish memoir; Amazon to develop 'delivery drones'

And we’re back! There’s plenty of book news to catch up on from the holiday weekend, including a memoir announcement, a plan to build “delivery drones,” and more. Read on for the top headlines:

Actress Jennie Garth announced her plans to publish a memoir titled Deep Thoughts From a Hollywood Blonde, covering her time on Beverly Hills, 90210 and her life as a single mom, on April 1, 2014 through New American Library, a division of Penguin, according to the press release. “The past few years have been full of changes. Now I’m on my own with my three kids, and I just crossed that tricky invisible line into my forties,” Garth says in a statement. “Maybe because of all these things or maybe despite them, I feel like another chapter in my life is just beginning. This book is my story about where I’ve been and where I’m headed — and what I’ve learned along the way.”

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has been everywhere in the news this year, from buying The Washington Post to battling e-book denouncers. Over the weekend, he unveiled the retail giant’s plan to develop delivery drones called “Octocopters,” which will fly packages straight to customers’ homes. See them in action in the video below. [Time]

Writer Natalya Gorbanevskaya, known for authoring pieces dissenting the Soviet Union and founding the underground magazine The Chronicle of Current Events, died Friday at age 77. [New York Times]

Thousands of copies of David Walliams’ children’s book fell into the sea during shipment, forcing HarperCollins to reprint an extra 30,000 copies. [The Telegraph]

ICYMI: Three unpublished J.D. Salinger stories leaked online via an eBay auction. [EW]

Here’s the New York Times Sunday Book Review‘s list of the 100 notable books of 2013. [New York Times]

And here’s The New Yorker‘s list of books to watch out for this month. [The New Yorker]

What happens when you have too many books? Claire Armitstead offers her tips for breaking up with your favorite titles. [The Guardian]

Another thought-provoking question: Is science fiction a dying genre? [The LA Review of Books]

Check out this fun collection of “Novelist Error Messages,” by Maggie Stiefvater.

On the Books: Amazon scrutinized over labor practices; first book published in the U.S. may break auction record

An undercover BBC reporter acquired video footage of how workers at an Amazon warehouse are treated, prompting the company to release a statement denying any wrongdoing. Meanwhile, a small book of psalms may fetch up to an estimated $30 million at an auction. Those headlines and more below:

BBC reporter Adam Littler went undercover as a worker at a U.K. Amazon warehouse and captured footage with his hidden camera of the retail giant’s questionable labor practices. But Amazon released a statement saying, “We strongly refute the charge that Amazon exploits its employees in any way. The safety of our associates is our number one priority, and we adhere to all regulations and employment law.” [BBC News]

A book of psalms that was printed in New England shortly after the voyage of the Mayflower may break the record for the most expensive text ever sold at an auction, and is expected to reach between $15-$30 million. [The Telegraph]

On a related note, The New Yorker takes a deep dive into previous auction heavyweights, including John James Audubon’s Birds of America, which sold for $11.5 million in 2010. [The New Yorker]

And even more high-priced book news: The New York Public Library bought all of Tom Wolfe’s papers for $2.15 million. [The New York Times]

We’re not done yet: The St. Mark’s Bookshop in New York’s East Village announced it will be launching a fundraiser for its move to a cheaper space. The bookstore will host an auction of signed first editions. [CBS New York]

On to the must-reads: Romesh Gunesekera published a new short story in The New Yorker titled “Roadkill.” [The New Yorker]

In an interview with The New York Times, National Book Award for fiction winner James McBride revealed he thought he had no chance against authors like Thomas Pynchon and Jhumpa Lahiri, so much so that he continued eating through the announcement. [The New York Times]

Writer Maria Popova posted her picks of the best biographies, memoirs, and history books of 2013. [Brain Pickings]

The Pacific Standard tackles the issue of fan-fiction: Can it be considered the next great genre of literature? [Pacific Standard]

On the Books: Debut novel bought by Scott Rudin finds publisher for a $2 million contract

A first-time novelist struck gold with a staggering publishing deal, as well as a film in the works. Meanwhile, Malala Yousafzai’s book has unsurprisingly been banned in Pakistan, and stateside, the U.S. Postal Service worked out a deal with Amazon to deliver packages on Sundays. Read on for more book news:

Knopf has won the rights to Garth Risk Hallberg’s debut novel, City on Fire, for a whopping nearly $2 million. The novel, which already scored a film deal with The Social Network producer Scott Rudin, comes in at 900 pages and ignited a furious battle between dozens of publishers. [New York Times]

Malala Yousafzai’s I Am Malala has been banned in Pakistan’s private schools for “content which is against our country’s ideology and Islamic values,” Kashif Mirza, chairman of All Pakistan Private Schools Federation, told the AFP. [NPR]

The U.S. Postal Service is partnering with Amazon to deliver packages on Sundays. The deal is limited to Los Angeles and New York, but service will expand to other cities next year.  [New York Times]

Threshold Editions announced Friday it is halting publication of Dylan Davies’ The Embassy House: The Explosive Eyewitness Account of the Libyan Embassy Siege by the Soldier Who Was There, a book about last year’s attack in Benghazi, Libya, after doubts emerged about whether Davies had witnessed the raid. [AP]

J.K. Rowling says she will “never top Harry Potter” in an interview. “As far back as 2000 I knew perfectly well that I would never top Harry Potter. I knew that before the series ended,” she says. “But what do I love doing? I love writing, so clearly I’m going to continue to write.” [The Telegraph]

S.E. Hinton has been known to be private and media-averse, but the Outsiders author is on Twitter, happily tweeting her thoughts. Jon Michaud explores what it means for the author to participate in the “Twitter age.” [The New Yorker]

Publishers Weekly unveiled its list of the Best Children’s Books of 2013. [Publishers Weekly]

Here’s a no-guilt guide to putting down a bad book. [The Globe and Mail]

On the Books: Indie bookstores reject Amazon Kindle exchange program

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Amazon’s latest effort to push Kindles through indie bookstores has not been well-received. Meanwhile, NaNoWriMo is in full swing, with a new take by grammar site Grammarly. Read on for more of today’s top books headlines: READ FULL STORY

Amazon picks its 10 best books of 2013

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Only a week into November, Amazon has already called its picks for best books of 2013. Some of the choices are bold, some are expected, but decide for yourself whether Amazon’s faves will make your holiday list. EW’s list is coming shortly, so stay tuned! READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Orson Scott Card to write more 'Ender's Game' books; Mia Couto wins Neustadt Prize

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Which series will see new installments? Who won top honors in the literary world this week? Those answers and more headlines below: READ FULL STORY

Jeff Bezos' wife gives Amazon book a one-star review

The wife of Jeff Bezos is giving a thumbs-down to a recent book about her husband’s company, Amazon.com Inc.

On Monday, MacKenzie Bezos posted a one-star review on the Amazon page for Brad Stone’s The Everything Store, which came out last month and has been received positively by critics and Amazon readers. Bezos wrote that the book was filled with inaccuracies and biased against her husband and Amazon. Spokeswoman Sarah Gelman of Seattle-based Amazon confirmed that the review was indeed written by MacKenzie Bezos.

“While numerous factual inaccuracies are certainly troubling in a book being promoted to readers as a meticulously researched definitive history, they are not the biggest problem here,” Bezos wrote. “The book is also full of techniques which stretch the boundaries of non-fiction, and the result is a lopsided and misleading portrait of the people and culture at Amazon.”

Stone, who authored the book, is a senior writer for Bloomberg Businessweek. As of Monday evening, his book ranked No. 109 on Amazon’s best seller list. The Everything Store is being billed as a rare look inside a “corporate culture of relentless ambition and secrecy,” a portrait Bezos is strongly disputing.

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