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Tag: Amazon (11-20 of 69)

On The Books: BookExpo to feature Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, Amy Poehler

The annual publishing convention BookExpo America began Wednesday at New York City’s Javits Convention Center. The four-day-long event will feature appearances from Neil Patrick Harris, Lena Dunham, and Amy Poehler, all of whom are promoting their forthcoming memoirs: Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography (Oct. 14), Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl (Oct. 7), and Poehler’s Yes Please (Oct. 28); other events include previews and discussions of film adaptations. EW’s YA expert Sara Vilokmerson is moderating The Fault in Our Stars event with author John Green and director Josh Boone, and EW’s Anthony Breznican  is moderating the This Is Where I Leave You panel with author Jonathan Tropper and actors Tina Fey and Jason Bateman. In addition to these star-studded events, the first-ever BookCon, modeled on ComicCon, will take place on the final day of BookExpo – organizers expect as many as 10,000 readers to attend. We can expect that the ongoing battle between Amazon and Hachette books will be a topic of discussion during BookExpo. [USA Today] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Hachette Amazon feud escalates, affecting Rowling and Connelly

The feud between Hachette Book Group and Amazon has intensified. The Los Angeles Times reports that Amazon has taken the pre-order buttons off of big Hachette titles, like The Burning Room by Michael Connelly and The Silkworm by Richard Galbraith, the pen name for J.K. Rowling. This is in addition to allegedly extending back order times for popular books, like Tina Fey’s Bossypants and Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point. Hachette has issued a statement saying they are “sparing no effort and exploring all options” to resolve this conflict, but Amazon has declined to comment. Hachette author James Patterson has been very outspoken about this battle. “What I don’t understand about this particular battle tactic is how it is in the best interest of Amazon customers,” he wrote on his Facebook page. “It certainly doesn’t appear to be in the best interest of authors.” READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Publisher accuses Amazon of deliberately delaying shipments of books

The publishing house Hachette Book Group has accused Amazon of deliberately delaying shipments of their books as a negotiation tactic to pressure the publisher into giving Amazon more favorable terms. Amazon has reportedly been marking many books published by Hachette as not available for at least two or three weeks. Titles by Malcolm Gladwell and J.D. Salinger are being delayed. Stephen Colbert’s America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t is listed as three weeks away, while James Patterson’s Alex Cross, Run is listed as a five-week wait. The New York Times reports that over the years Amazon has employed a number of ruthless tactics against publishing houses, even removing the “buy” buttons from some books! [New York Times] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Anne Rice stands up to haters on Amazon

Anne Rice, defender of vampire erotica, Christian lit and gothic New Orleans, has come out against haters who trash authors on Amazon.com. I love Anne Rice. I love her steamy fantasy. I love that she jumps in and out of the Catholic Church like it’s a swimming pool. What a treasure. Her house tour in NOLA is on my bucket list. Rice is miffed by the “bullies, trolls, jerks or whatever you call them” that abuse authors in the comments section of Amazon. She has signed a petition to require identity verification from commenters. On her Facebook page, Rice says “Amazon is such a wonderful system and so many go there to offer heartfelt authentic customer reviews of the books they read; too bad that the anti-author bullies have misused and abused anonymity there for their endless preying on writers. They are a tiny minority, true, but to the authors they harass and torment and endlessly attack, they are no joking matter.” I don’t know that identity verification would be progress, but it’s a good idea to draw attention to the issue of cyber-bullying writers. [Guardian]

This month’s fiction podcast on The New Yorker’s website is a chilling tale by Mary Gaitskill called “The Other Place,” chosen and read by the author Jennifer Egan. Egan was struck by the story’s “intense menace mixed with other kinds of complicated humanity, specifically parenthood and redemption.” A father is watching his son develop the same magnetism to evil and fascination with hurting women that he has curdling inside him. The father is troubled by this and he reflects on his own experience trying to quell this darkness. Creepy, and very stirring. [The New Yorker]

Hanif Kureishi, the author of The Buddha of Suburbia and my new favorite truth-teller, spewed out a rant against creative writing students despite his actually being a creative writing professor at Kingston University in the UK. “A lot of them [students] don’t really understand,” said Kureishi. “It’s the story that really helps you. They worry about the writing and the prose and you think: ‘F— the prose, no one’s going to read your book for the writing, all they want to do is find out what happens in the story next.’ ” How do I audit this class? [Guardian]

On the Books: Hugh Howey to publish Kurt Vonnegut-inspired book

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Today’s top headlines include authors adapting from previous works, as well as some e-book related news and notable deaths. Read on for more: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Amazon unveils best-selling books of 2013; Lindsay Lohan allegedly writing tell-all

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We’re starting the week with a round-up of the best-selling books, news on a possible book by “celebrity” Lindsay Lohan, as well as a forthcoming actual celebrity self-help book that’s (gasp!) not by Gwyneth Paltrow. Read on for today’s top headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Jane Austen portrait sells for $270,000; federal judge dismisses booksellers' lawsuit against publishers

Wednesday’s books headlines includes the selling of Jane Austen portrait, an end to the legal battle between indie booksellers and publishing houses, and some bad news for Mike Tyson. Read on for those stories and more below: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Amazon finds indie booksellers make up a quarter of top Kindle Direct Publishing ebook sales

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Good news for indie booksellers: They’re making a dent in Amazon’s Top 100 ebooks sold on the Amazon Kindle. Meanwhile, Norway is making steps toward digitizing all books in the 20th century. More on those stories and other top headlines below:

Amazon revealed a quarter of the top 100 Kindle ebook sales — through Kindle Direct Publishing — in the U.S. were by self-publishing indie authors and publishers. [The Guardian]

The National Library of Norway has been digitizing every book published in Norwegian since 2006 and will finish doing so in the next two to three decades. Anyone in Norway will eventually have access to all 20th century works, including those under copyright, writes The Atlantic‘s Alexis C. Madrigal. [The Atlantic]

Writer José Esteban Muñoz, known for his studies on queer theory, gender, and sexuality, has died at age 46. [The University of Minnesota Press]

Baltimore has become “The City That Reads,” with about 160,000 children’s books being distributed free to the city’s schoolteachers this week. [Baltimore Sun]

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America named sci-fi author Samuel R. Delany the grandmaster for 2013. Delany will be presented with the award at the Nebula Awards in 2014. [LA Times]

Collections of artful accidents in Google Books scans have cropped up online. Kenneth Goldsmith examines their appearances. [The New Yorker]

This year’s National Book Award winner for fiction James McBride talked how he writes, where he writes, and what he does when he’s rewriting. [The Daily Beast]

Looking for a gift for a young reader? Check out this list of holiday-friendly children’s books. [USA Today]

On the Books: Tom Clancy's 'Jack Ryan' franchise may continue; 'Catfish' host Nev Schulman lands book deal

It’s quite a Wednesday for book news — today’s top stories feature Jack Ryan, Catfish, and bad sex. Read on for more headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Jennie Garth to publish memoir; Amazon to develop 'delivery drones'

And we’re back! There’s plenty of book news to catch up on from the holiday weekend, including a memoir announcement, a plan to build “delivery drones,” and more. Read on for the top headlines:

Actress Jennie Garth announced her plans to publish a memoir titled Deep Thoughts From a Hollywood Blonde, covering her time on Beverly Hills, 90210 and her life as a single mom, on April 1, 2014 through New American Library, a division of Penguin, according to the press release. “The past few years have been full of changes. Now I’m on my own with my three kids, and I just crossed that tricky invisible line into my forties,” Garth says in a statement. “Maybe because of all these things or maybe despite them, I feel like another chapter in my life is just beginning. This book is my story about where I’ve been and where I’m headed — and what I’ve learned along the way.”

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has been everywhere in the news this year, from buying The Washington Post to battling e-book denouncers. Over the weekend, he unveiled the retail giant’s plan to develop delivery drones called “Octocopters,” which will fly packages straight to customers’ homes. See them in action in the video below. [Time]

Writer Natalya Gorbanevskaya, known for authoring pieces dissenting the Soviet Union and founding the underground magazine The Chronicle of Current Events, died Friday at age 77. [New York Times]

Thousands of copies of David Walliams’ children’s book fell into the sea during shipment, forcing HarperCollins to reprint an extra 30,000 copies. [The Telegraph]

ICYMI: Three unpublished J.D. Salinger stories leaked online via an eBay auction. [EW]

Here’s the New York Times Sunday Book Review‘s list of the 100 notable books of 2013. [New York Times]

And here’s The New Yorker‘s list of books to watch out for this month. [The New Yorker]

What happens when you have too many books? Claire Armitstead offers her tips for breaking up with your favorite titles. [The Guardian]

Another thought-provoking question: Is science fiction a dying genre? [The LA Review of Books]

Check out this fun collection of “Novelist Error Messages,” by Maggie Stiefvater.

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