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Tag: Alice Munro (1-9 of 9)

On The Books: 2013's Ten Most Challenged Books

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Every year the American Library Association publishes a list of the most challenged books in the country to keep the public informed of encroaching censorship. The ALA defines a challenge as “a formal, written complaint, filed with a library or school requesting that materials be removed because of content or appropriateness.” The number of challenges reflects only incidents reported. The group estimates that for every reported challenge, four or five remain unreported. This year’s list is topped by the The Adventures of Captain Underpants series, which also held that slot in 2012. The humorous and cartoony book about two 4th grade boys and their imaginary-turned-real superhero Captain Underpants was cited for: offensive language, unsuited for age group, and violence. Fifty Shades of Grey also made the list, as did The Hunger Games. Check out the complete list. READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Alice Munro is so money

In honor of the Nobel laureate winner, Canada has put Alice Munro on a new collector’s coin. The Guardian reports that the engraving on the coin is of an “ethereal female figure emerging from a pen as a representation of one of the many central characters from Alice Munro’s beloved short stories,” said the Mint, as well as an image of an open book, inscribed with a passage from Munro’s The View from Castle Rock. Two other notable author’s are getting honored by mints around the world: Jane Austen will be appearing on future £10 notes in England and Astrid Lindgren her character Pippi Longstocking will grace Sweden’s 20 kronor notes next year. The irony is not lost on me. Attention writers: you will be penniless in life, but after death — if you’re lucky — they’ll be printing money with your face on it.

A previously unpublished short story by Tennessee Williams is going to be printed in The Strand magazine’s spring issue. It’s called “Crazy Nights” and it’s about his college girlfriend, Anna Jean, who he dated at the University of Missouri. The themes are similar to his other works and the characters are titular, cynical and filled with disappointment. His narrator enjoys “the ultimate degree of intimacy” with Anna Jean. “Both her arms were lifted toward me,” wrote Williams. “I had fallen between them. And the rest of what happened between us was a blind thing, almost involuntary, drawing from us both something that seemed hardly a part of ourselves.” [The Guardian]

READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Oprah unveils latest book club pick; more than 500 authors lobby UN over international bill of digital rights

We’ve got plenty of book news for today: Oprah chose a new title for her book club, award-winning authors around the world are protesting state surveillance, and more book deals have been announced. (A sports item even made its way into this morning’s headlines.) Read on for more:

Oprah Winfrey has announced a new Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 pick: The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd, about two women on a quest for freedom. “The moment I finished The Invention of Wings, I knew this had to be the next Book Club selection,” Winfrey said in the press release. “These strong female character represent the women that have shaped our history and, through Sue’s imaginative storytelling, give us a new perspective on slavery, injustice and the search for freedom.”

More than 500 authors — including Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Tom Stoppard, and Margaret Atwood — are lobbying the United Nations over an international bill of digital rights, releasing a joint statement protesting state surveillance. “A person under surveillance is on longer free; a society under surveillance is no longer a democracy,” they wrote. “WE DEMAND THE RIGHT for all people to determine, as democratic citizens, to what extent their personal data may be legally collected, stored and processed, and by whom.” [The Guardian]

Parks/MacDonald Productions has won the movie and TV rights to the book League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth, written by ESPN reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainuru. PBS Frontline produced a documentary earlier this year on the investigation over football-related injuries based on the book. [Variety]

Actor Terry Crews has inked a deal for his first book Manhood with Ballantine Bantam Dell to be published May 2014. According to the press release, the book will cover Crews’ life and 25-year marriage, “including straight-talking advice for men and the women who love them.”

The winners of 2013′s Roald Dahl Funny Prize, honoring children’s books, have been announced, with Jim Smith’s I Am Still Not a Loser taking the prize in the 7-14 category, and Simon Rickerty’s Monkey Nut winning for ages six and under. [The Telegraph]

The world’s oldest romance novelist, Ida Pollock, has died at the age of 105. Pollock’s daughter said the writer, who authored more than 120 books, died Dec. 3 at a nursing home near her house in Lanreath, England. [USA Today]

Stephen King joined Twitter Friday. “My first tweet,” he posted. “No longer a virgin. Be gentle!” [Twitter]

Charles McGrath discussed what it’s like to judge the National Book Awards. [The New York Times]

Instead of delivering the traditional Nobel Lecture in Literature speech, 2013 winner Alice Munro released a video interview. [Nobelprize.org]

You’ve seen our lists for best fiction and non-fiction; now check out other critics’ picks. Did USA Today‘s Jocelyn McClurg and Bob Minzesheimer select your favorites from 2013? [USA Today]

On the Books: Maya Angelou, Judy Blume sign open letter to Obama on standardized testing; Emily Dickinson manuscripts digitally archived

Today’s bevy of book news includes an open letter, another digital archive, and a retirement that’s up in the air. Read on for more top headlines: READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Harper Lee sues hometown museum; Alice Munro to miss Nobel awards ceremony

This week’s books news kicks off with a lawsuit, a shortlist, and a petition. Read on for today’s top headlines:

To Kill a Mockingbird novelist Harper Lee is suing a museum in her hometown for selling souvenirs with her name on them. [USA Today]

The shortlist for the 2014 Red House Children’s Book Award has been announced. The winners will be announced in London on Feb. 22, 2014. [The Telegraph]

Alice Munro, the winner of this year’s Nobel Prize in Literature, will miss the awards ceremony in Stockholm for health reasons. [Nobel Prize Twitter]

After Eleanor Catton’s The Luminaries won the Man Booker Prize last week, British publisher Granta is rush-printing an extra 100,000 copies of the novel. [The Guardian]

Several self-published pornography writers whose works were removed by Amazon and other e-book retailers have launched a petition in protest. [LA Times]

Authors are accepting censorship rules in China in order to see their books published. [The New York Times]

Today’s must-read: John Williams’s Stoner has found an unexpected following in Europe, thanks to a translation by French writer Anna Gavalda. And as The New Yorker says, it’s the “greatest American novel you’ve never heard of.” [The New Yorker]

Up for debate: Sam Jordison argues that Edgar Allan Poe’s storytelling is more snooze-worthy than thrilling. Quoth the Raven: “Zzzzz.” [The Guardian]

On the Books: Printing faux pas in new 'Bridget Jones'; writers celebrate Alice Munro

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Today’s books news kicks off with a goof that’s worthy of its title character, while in other news, McDonald has replaced Happy Meals toys with books about nutrition. Read on for more headlines: READ FULL STORY

Authors take to Twitter to toast Alice Munro on Nobel Prize

The book world is a buzz with the news that short story virtuoso Alice Munro has been awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature. Fans and well-wishers — including other prominent authors — have taken to Twitter to congratulate Munro. Check out Margaret Atwood, Jodi Picoult, Salman Rushdie, and others’ reactions to the “master of the contemporary story” winning the Nobel Prize:

Margaret Atwood

Reza Aslan

Christopher Barzak

Harlan Coben

  Hart Hanson

Jodi Picoult

Anne Mazer 

Patrick Ness

  Andrew Pyper

Corey Redekop

Salman Rushdie

Cheryl Strayed

Melissa Wiley

On the Books: Stephen Baldwin sued for missing book deadline; Alice Munro wins Nobel Prize in Literature

This morning’s books news is all about the Nobel Prize (congratulations, Alice Munro), but aside from the announcement, there’s a bevy of lawsuits, betrayals, and even teenage angst to cover in the literary world. Read on for today’s top books headlines: READ FULL STORY

Alice Munro is the 13th woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature

Canadian author Alice Munro, cited as a “master of the contemporary story,” was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature this morning in Stockholm, Sweden. In a statement, she said, “This is so surprising and wonderful. I am dazed by all the attention and affection that has been coming my way this morning. It is such an honour to receive this wonderful recognition from the Nobel Committee, and I send them my thanks.”

She added, “When I began writing there was a very small community of Canadian writers and little attention was paid by the world. Now Canadian writers are read, admired and respected around the globe. I’m so thrilled to be chosen as this year’s Nobel Prize recipient. I hope it fosters further interest in all Canadian writers. I also hope that this brings further recognition to the short story form.”

Munro, 82, has been listed as a leading contender for the honor for several years after having won most of the top literary prizes for which she’s eligible. Her first short story collection, Dance of the Happy Shades, garnered rave reviews in upon its release in 1968. Of her 14 short story collections, Open Secrets (1994) is often considered her seminal work. Her stories often center on rural settings in Southern Ontario and tend to be more driven by salient details and revelations than external events.

Last year, Munro announced that Dear Life, which came out in paperback in June, would be her final short story collection.

Munro is the first North American author to receive the prize since the United States’ Toni Morrison won in 1993. The winner is also awarded 8 million Swedish kronor, or about $1.2 million.

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