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Category: News (1-10 of 626)

Judy Blume's 'In the Unlikely Event' set to debut in 2015, plot details revealed

Judy Blume has revealed some details of her latest novel, and while the book is aimed at adults, the new work will pull from the author’s own childhood.

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Lost letter that inspired 'On the Road' discovered, to go up for auction

Long thought to be a permanently lost part of literary history, the letter that inspired Jack Kerouac to write On the Road has not just been discovered, but it will also soon be available on the auction block.

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(Updated) Chris Colfer to continue 'Land of Stories' series with new novels, picture books

UPDATE: Chris Colfer tweeted out the titles for his Land of Stories companion books–The Mother Goose Diaries and Queen Red Riding Hood’s Guide To Royalty–and wrote that the picture books will be about the characters Curvy Tree and Trollbella.

ORIGINAL STORY: Though Glee‘s story may be coming to a close, Chris Colfer is hard at work on expanding another one of his stories.

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Iraq war veteran Phil Klay wins National Book Award

Phil Klay, an Iraq war veteran, won the National Book Award for fiction on Nov. 18 for his debut collection of short stories, Redeployment.

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'Witches of East End' YA spinoff may resolve TV show's cliffhangers

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Fans of Lifetime’s Witches of East End, based on the book series by Melissa de la Cruz, haven’t given up hope that they’ll see the Beauchamp family again after the network canceled the show Nov. 4. But if the online petitions and multiple hashtags don’t work to resurrect the drama—fans are mobilizing Nov. 6 to trend #RenewWitchesOfEastEnd from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.—de la Cruz might be able to ease the pain of those unresolved cliffhangers.

On July 14, Putnam will publish the first book in the YA spinoff series. Triple Moon: Summer on East End, set 10 years after Winds of Salem, introduces two new teen witches, Mardi and Molly Overbrook, the twin daughters of Troy Overbrook (Thor). They’re sent to live with their “Aunt” Ingrid Beauchamp in North Hampton, after they cause a terrible accident at their old high school. As Ingrid teaches them to control their magical impulses so the White Council won’t exile them to Limbo, the girls meet the younger Gardiner boys and spend the summer learning how to grow up, how to love, and how to be a family. READ FULL STORY

Lena Dunham defends against sexual abuse accusations

Following the release of Lena Dunham’s memoir/essay collection hybrid Not That Kind of Girl, a few outlets pointed to passages from the book in which they say that the author, director, and actress admits to committing sexual abuse when she was a child. Dunham—in a self-described “rage spiral”—has taken to Twitter to refute the claims.

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2014 National Book Award finalists announced

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This morning on NPR’s Morning Edition, the National Book Foundation announced the 20 finalists for the National Book Awards in four categories.

The Fiction shortlist includes Anthony Doerr’s best-seller All the Light We Cannot See, Phil Klay’s debut collection of wartime short stories, and Emily St. John Mandel’s breakout post-apocalyptic novel Station Eleven. The Nonfiction list is most notable for its inclusion of Roz Chast for her graphic memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?—Chast is the first cartoonist nominated in an adult category.

See below for a full list of finalists in all categories. READ FULL STORY

Australian author Richard Flanagan wins the Man Booker Prize

Australian author Richard Flanagan has won the Man Booker Prize for The Narrow Road to the Deep North—plus the £50,000 (about $80,000) prize and the great prestige that come with it.

Flanagan, born in Tasmania and living in Australia, is the third Aussie to win the award, which he received at a ceremony on Tuesday in London. The judges described his sixth book, published by Chatto & Windus, as “a harrowing account of the cost of war to all who are caught up in it.” Set in World War II, The Narrow Road tells the story of a surgeon in a Japanese POW camp along the Thailand-Burma Death Railway. The novel was partly inspired by Flanagan’s father’s experiences as a Japanese POW—he died at age 98 on the day his son finished the book.

“The two great themes from the origin of literature are love and war: this is a magnificent novel of love and war,” said chair of the judges A.C. Grayling. “Written in prose of extraordinary elegance and force, it bridges East and West, past and present, with a story of guilt and heroism.”

Flanagan’s win carries a special historical significance because this year marked the first time ever that the competition was open to writers from any country, as long as their work was published in English in the U.K. (Previously, only citizens of the U.K. Commonwealth, Ireland or Zimbabwe were eligible.) Brits still nabbed half of the spots on September’s shortlist, and British author Neel Mukherjee was the favorite to win for The Lives Of Others, set in 1960s India.

Flanagan is as surprised as anyone else by his win. “In Australia, the Man Booker is sometimes seen as something of a chicken raffle,” Flanagan said. “I just didn’t expect to end up the chicken.”

 

 

On the Books: Salman Rushdie shares PEN prize with Syrian activist Mazen Darwish

- Author Salman Rushdie is sharing his PEN Pinter prize with Syrian journalist, lawyer, and human rights activist Mazen Darwish. Darwish has been imprisoned in Syria since February 2012, where he is currently awaiting trial on charges of publicizing terrorist acts, according to English PEN. The founder of the Syrian Centre for Media and Freedom of Expression could face up to 15 years in prison if convicted. “Darwish courageously fought for civilised values—free expression, human rights—in one of the most dangerous places in the world,” said Rushdie, speaking at last night’s ceremony at the British Library in London. “His continued detention is arbitrary and unjust. He should be freed immediately, and we must hope this award may help, by shining a light on his plight.”

English PEN, a British free speech organization, established the joint prize five years ago in the name of Nobel Prize-winning British playwright Harold Pinter, who died of cancer in 2008. Half of the prize is awarded to a British author whose work helps defend freedom of speech and justice. Rushdie was selected for his “many years of speaking out for freedom of expression,” according to judges chair Maureen Freely. “When he sees writers unjustly vilified, prosecuted or forced into exile, he takes a personal interest.” The other half of the prize goes to an international writer who has been persecuted for doing similar work. [The Guardian] READ FULL STORY

French writer Patrick Modiano wins Nobel Prize in Literature

The Swedish Academy announced this morning that French historical novelist Patrick Modiano has won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature, calling him “a Marcel Proust of our time.” Modiano, 69, is an unexpected pick—beating out the favorites, Japanese author Haruki Murakami and Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o, to win the award worth eight million kronor (about $1.1 million USD). READ FULL STORY

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