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Category: TV (31-40 of 102)

Doubleday to publish Judy Greer's essay collection: 'I Don't Know What You Know Me From'

You might know her from FX’s animated show Archer as the voice of Cheryl, or if you’re an Arrested Development fan, she’ll always be Kitty Sanchez, but with the upcoming publication of her first book, Judy Greer is proving that in addition to being a comedic actress, she is also a comedic author. Doubleday has recently acquired the rights to Greer’s humorous essay collection, I Don’t Know What You Know Me From: Confessions of a Co-Star.

Greer’s essays cover a variety of topics, from growing up in the Midwest to her career in film and television (often playing a “best friend”) as well as other predicaments, such as a solo trip she once took to Spain. READ FULL STORY

Five things we learned about the Mariah Carey-Tommy Mottola marriage from record exec's new memoir

The music biz memoir has become one of the hottest trends over the past couple of years — and the boys in the (record label) boardroom are not getting left behind. Today, Grand Central is publishing Tommy Mottola’s autobiography, Hitmaker: The Man and his Music, which he co-penned with Cal Fussman. Formerly the Chairman CEO of Sony Music, Mottola developed an amazing array of talent, including Celine Dion, Gloria Estefan, Shakira, and Mariah Carey. Mottola thought Carey was so amazing that in 1993 he married her, despite being both more than two decades older and the songbird’s technical boss.

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What we learned about Neil Gaiman's influences from his interview with NPR

When reading the wildly imaginative works of Neil Gaiman, one can’t help but wonder, “How does he think up this stuff?” The Coraline and American Gods author revealed a bit of what may be an answer to that question Monday when he chatted with Steve Inskeep on NPR’s Morning Edition.

The interview was part of the public radio station’s “Watch This” series, which has featured pop culture recommendations from the likes of Sherman Alexie, Kevin Smith and Lisa Kudrow. Read on for what Gaiman had to say about four favorites of his – and where EW can see these influences in his own works. READ FULL STORY

Oprah and Ayana Mathis talk 'Twelve Tribes of Hattie' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

For those of you who love books, Oprah, and football (marry me?), maybe you should start your Super Bowl party early this year.

On Sunday, Feb. 3, as part of Super Soul Sunday on OWN, Oprah Winfrey is sitting down with 39-year-old debut novelist Ayana Mathis to discuss The Twelve Tribes of Hattie. Oprah’s selection of Hattie for Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 put Mathis on the map in a big way. The novel has drawn comparisons to the work of Toni Morrison, and it has shot to the Top 20 Fiction best-sellers list. Check out a clip below to see Mathis talk about the awesomeness and pressure of being an Oprah’s Book Club pick: READ FULL STORY

'Elimination Night': 'American Idol' parody's 6 craziest moments

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Elimination Night is a fictionalized account of one young producer’s experiences working at Project Icon — a behemoth singing competition that bears more than a passing resemblance to American Idol. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt will only say that the book’s scribe has “intimate firsthand knowledge of the behind-the-scenes workings of a top TV talent show.”)

In the book, one judge issues a 78-page rider that demands a 4,000 square foot “dressing compound,” a $1 billion body insurance policy (“breasts/buttocks to be valued at one hundred million dollars each”), and that the show’s crew never make eye contact with her. Another has to undergo a “sanity check” — which he barely passes — before signing on to join Icon‘s panel. The innocent, apple-cheeked, country-singing winner of the fictional reality show is actually a promiscuous, closeted Don Juan who enjoyed encounters with “hotel workers, judges’ assistants, his fellow contestants, [and] even a couple of passing construction workers” during filming.

And those aren’t even the juiciest moments from the story! Check out the book’s craziest plot points below.

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'Doctor Who' to be celebrated by LGBTQ fans in new essay anthology 'Queers Dig Time Lords'

The longrunning British science fiction show Doctor Who has repeatedly portrayed gay, lesbian, and bisexual characters in a positive light — even when the character in question happens to be a green lizard-lady. Now the LGBTQ community is reciprocating that affection in book form.

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Geek Deep Dive: Writing the 'Star Trek' history book, 'Federation: The First 150 Years'

In my half-dozen years at Entertainment Weekly, I have never received an object as deliciously deep-dish geeky as David A. Goodman’s Federation: The First 150 Years. (Sorry, two-volume, 12 pound graphic novelization of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower. You had a really good run there.)

As any Trekkie has likely ascertained already, Federation (out now) is a history of Star Trek‘s United Federation of Planets — the grand interstellar organization at the heart of Gene Roddenberry’s wagon train to the stars — written as if it really happened, from life on a war-ravaged Earth in the 1990s through the death of James T. Kirk. The book comes with translated historical documents, rare archival artifacts, and a light-up pedestal that features the voice of George Takei as Admiral Hikaru Sulu, commander-and-chief of Starfleet, introducing the reader to the tome before them.

Like I said: Deep. Dish. Geeky. READ FULL STORY

'Sweet Valley High' to be released on e-reader Tuesday, see the covers now!

First the Baby-Sitters Club and now Sweet Valley High? We might just explode from a fit of teen lit nostalgia. Sweet Valley High is the latest ’80s YA series to receive an electronic makeover. The first twelve books will be available on eReaders, smartphones, and tablets Tuesday. Have identical twins Jessica and Elizabeth Wakefield — the original “California gurls” — changed at all since they first hit the shelves of teens and tweens everywhere in 1983? Brainy Elizabeth and on-again-off again boyfriend Todd Wilkins are still having their ups and downs and the popular Jessica is still getting into hijincks with her frenemy Lila Fowler.

The colors on the covers may be brighter in pixel form, and the books live on to pack their addictive candy-like punch. Click through to see exclusive images of the book covers, featuring the Wakefield twins and their BFFs.  READ FULL STORY

License to kill (at telling anecdotes): Sir Roger Moore remembers his time playing 007

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Thanks to Skyfall, the world has contracted James Bond fever again — and even former 007-er Sir Roger Moore isn’t immune. “It’s absolutely marvelous,” says the British actor of the latest Bond adventure, which opens in the U.S. today. “It’s the best Bond film without a doubt.”

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Random House buys Lena Dunham's book for more than $3.5 million

Hannah Horvath would be seething with jealousy right now.

Lena Dunham, the 26-year-old star and creator of the hit HBO series Girls, has landed a book deal at Random House for a massive $3.5 million. That’s more than the $2 million Dick Cheney received for his memoir In My Time and short of Amanda Knox’s $4 million and Tina Fey’s $5 million for Bossypants.

Bidding for the debut essay collection — titled Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She’s Learned — started at $1 million and quickly climbed as publishers pursued the hot property. The 66-page book proposal contained “color, illustrations and a humor that publishing executives predicted could produce another bestseller like Tina Fey’s blockbuster memoir,” according to the New York Times. READ FULL STORY

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