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Category: TV (11-20 of 102)

'Pity the Antihero,' an essay by 'Shovel Ready' author Adam Sternbergh

Adam Sternbergh is the culture editor of The New York Times Magazine. Formerly an editor-at-large for New York, his writing has been featured in several other publications including GQ, The Times of London, and on the radio program This American Life. He lives in Brooklyn. His first novel, Shovel Ready, will be published by Crown on January 14, 2014. He is at work on a second Spademan novel, Near Enemy, which is set to publish in 2015.

Pity the antihero. Amid his usual routine of skirting the law, living by a code, and implicitly calling into question the validity of our bourgeois social structures, he (or she!) must now contend with a new menace: Antihero fatigue.

This fatigue started, as with so many things, on our TV screens. No sooner had Breaking Bad, that brilliant showcase for the morally decaying American male, ended its series run then TV watchers publicly brushed their hands and announced they were done with the antihero. “Can We Make Walter White Our Last Antihero, Please?” read the straightforward headline of one typical essay. The Shield? Great. Mad Men? Of course. Breaking Bad? Huzzah! Antiheros sure had a good run, but now we’ve had our fill. READ FULL STORY

Shonda Rhimes lands book deal for memoir(ish) take on work and family

If you’re like me and have to watch Grey’s Anatomy with closed captions to keep up with the characters’ fast-paced emotional monologues (“Something something I’m your person something something dark and twisty something me something ME!”), you’ll love this news: Shonda Rhimes is getting a book deal!

The creator of Scandal, Grey’s, and Private Practice has inked a deal with Simon & Schuster for a book that’s being billed as “part memoir, part inspiration, part prescription.” Rhimes — a single mother of three girls — will write about building her family on the cusp of her skyrocketing Hollywood career and navigating the subsequent challenges that come from balancing those two facets of her life.

“Simon and Schuster is crazy for giving me a book deal as I am clearly in no position to be handing out wisdom,” Rhimes said in a release. “But I have made a lot of mistakes as a single mother and as a working mother and as a sleepless mother and as a dating mother. And I did all of it while running a bunch of TV shows. So I’m going to write about that and hope my kids don’t use it against me in therapy later.”

The book is due for publication in 2015.

See the cover of Judy Greer's upcoming memoir -- EXCLUSIVE

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Even if you only learned her name recently, you totally recognize Judy Greer. She was one of the best parts of Arrested Development, served as a trusty (or back-stabbing) best friend in popular rom-coms, showed us her dramatic side in The Descendants, and elevated many a network sitcom with her presence.

Now the onscreen best friend will make you feel like she’s your actual best friend in her upcoming book of essays, I Don’t Know What You Know Me From: Confessions of a Co-Star (out April 8, 2014). In the book, Greer will write about her trip to the Oscars, bad blind dates, Spanx, behind-the-scenes stories, and how she really feels about fans telling her she’s prettier in person.

“BUY MY BOOK! PLEASE!,” says Greer to EW. “I’m just kidding (not really). Seriously though, this book is all about my life, which is a lot like yours, especially if you’ve peed next to J. Lo.”

See the back cover, also exclusive, of the book below: READ FULL STORY

Has Fox News fought criticism with fake commenter accounts?

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In a new book called Murdoch’s World: The Last of the Old Media Empires, author David Folkenflik — who is an NPR media reporter — writes that in the mid- to late-aughts, Fox’s PR team was tasked with countering “not just negative and even neutral blog postings but the anti-Fox comments beneath them.”

According to a book excerpt posted Sunday on progressive site Media Matters, Folkenflik even found one former Fox staffer who “recalled using 20 different aliases to post pro-Fox rants.”

“Another,” Folkenflik adds, “had one hundred.”

Allegedly, the authors of these fake comments went to great lengths to conceal their true identities. “Several employees had to acquire a cell phone thumb drive to provide a wireless broadband connection that could not be traced back to a Fox News or News Corp account,” Folkenflik explains. “Another used an AOL dial-up connection, even in the age of widespread broadband access, on the rationale it would be harder to pinpoint its origins.”

And the directive to fight criticism with comments apparently came from on high: “Old laptops were distributed for these cyber operations,” according to Murdoch’s World.

Folkenflik cites “four former Fox News employees” as his sources; he does not claim that current staffers are still utilizing these tactics.

Fox News has not yet responded to EW’s request for comment.

'Paddle Your Own Canoe': Nick Offerman talks manners, college life, and -- what else? -- manliness

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With his Pyramid of Greatness, woodworking prowess, and lust for bacon and eggs, Ron Swanson of Parks and Recreation seems like the ultimate man: a carnivorous, all-American alpha male who can fashion rings in 20 minutes and escape all women named Tammy.

But Nick Offerman insists, despite his love of woodworking and iconic mustache, he’s nothing like his character — after all, he’s an artist who went to theater school and danced ballet, and even puts on makeup for work every day. In his new book, Paddle Your Own Canoe, he not only explores his Paul Bunyan-like image with tongue-in-cheek lessons on manliness, complete with illustrations and advice, but also offers poignant memories of his childhood growing up in Illinois and hilarious anecdotes from his career.

The actor spoke to EW about his writing process, his favorite memories, and what it truly means to be manly. Hint: No punching involved — unless it’s something to do with Jamm. READ FULL STORY

'Duck Dynasty' star Si Robertson talks 'Si-cology 1' -- EXCLUSIVE

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The big-bearded Robertson clan is turning their Duck Dynasty into a formidable publishing dynasty. Willie and Korie Robertson’s book The Duck Commander Family has been lighting up the charts for 38 weeks, and Phil Robertson’s Happy, Happy, Happy has been the biggest hit of all. Now wise-cracking Uncle Si is getting in on the publishing action with Si-Cology 1 (out today), which includes Si’s tall tales and one-liners. Check out two videos starring Si below; the first is a look inside his photo album, and the second an interview about recording the audiobook: READ FULL STORY

Drawings of 'Breaking Bad' characters as ghosts by Doogie Horner -- EXCLUSIVE

I am the one who..haunts?

Comedian, writer and designer Doogie Horner, who reinterpreted the spooky icon as different pop culture characters in 100 Ghosts, his book of drawings, has created a series of new ones just for Breaking Bad. Horner explores these ghosts for characters both dead and alive on the hit drama and even makes Heisenberg look downright innocent as a hovering white sheet.

“Why are people afraid of ghosts? I think it’s because ghosts say ‘boo,’ and people are afraid of criticism, but also because ghosts live in graveyards and are sometimes filled with spiders,” Horner writes in his introduction to 100 Ghosts. “But ghosts are just dead people, and most people are nice.” Just not Walter White, of course. READ FULL STORY

Unaired 'Borgias' series finale to be released as e-book

Showtime announced via Twitter that the recently canceled period drama The Borgias will receive a proper ending in text form with the release of The Borgia Apocalypse to major e-book retailers this week. The e-book is based on show creator Neil Jordan’s original script for the two-hour series finale.

The series, which ended this June in its third season, chronicled the insatiable appetites and devious ambitions of the Borgia family led by Jeremy Irons as Pope Alexander VI. Fans of the departed cable series who were left wondering what happened next for Pope Alexander, lovers/siblings Lucrezia and Cesare, or assassin Micheletto need not look at another Wikipedia entry about the infamous historical dynasty for a sense of closure.

Will you pick up a copy of The Borgia Apocalpyse? Sound off in the comments below!

Robert Galbraith offered TV deals and other details from J.K. Rowling's FAQ section

J.K. Rowling may not be happy to have been outed as the true author behind pseudonym Robert Galbraith and his detective novel debut The Cuckoo’s Calling. But with increased sales and a barrage of media attention, Rowling decided to speak out about her latest work, releasing a new Frequently Asked Questions section on Robert Galbraith’s official website.

Here are five of the most interesting tidbits to come out of Rowling/Galbraith’s FAQ answers: READ FULL STORY

'Falling Skies' showrunner's debut novel to take place on steampunk Pangea

Remi Aubuchon announced last month that he is stepping down from his post as showrunner for TNT’s Falling Skies before the expected fourth season in order to focus on his debut novel. The TV job was simply “all-consuming” and left little time for writing a novel.

Ahead of the alien-invasion show’s season 3 premiere tomorrow, Aubuchon provided some details about the yet-untitled book: It will take place in a steampunk civilization on a Pangea-like supercontinent. “It imagines a world in which there’s one solid continent, but it’s in the middle of breaking up, so that’s causing a lot of havoc, [including] political havoc,” Aubuchon explains. READ FULL STORY

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