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Category: News (81-90 of 626)

On The Books: Dr. Seuss' hats hit the road!

From there to here, from here to there, funny hats are everywhere! Dr. Seuss was a fiend for hats, which shouldn’t come as a surprise. But for the first time in history 26 of his hats will tour the world. These guys have rarely been outside of his house in La Jolla, and they’re pretty excited to visit six states in the next seven months. Can’t you just picture a Seuss book about his hats flying around the world? He used the hats as the basis for The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. Reacquaint yourself with some of his art and design work here. You will not want to miss this exhibit. [NPR]

James Patterson, who’s sold a bajillion novels, is donating $1 million to 50 independent bookstores across the nation. A worthy cause supported by a man who is “one of the industry’s wealthiest writers.” [New York Times]

Wikipedia wants a book deal. Indiegogo wants to print the entire English Wikipedia in 1,000 books with 1,200 pages each. Trees around the world are shuddering. Even though they have proposed to use “sustainable paper,” this sounds like a total waste. Upshot: you could now reference Wikipedia as a legitimate bibliographic source. [The Guardian]

Neil Gaiman, the king of multimedia artistic endeavors, will be doing a live reading of The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains backed by a string quartet playing music to accompany the tale of a search for hidden treasure. Illustrations by Eddie Campbell will  be projected during the performance. Shows will be at New York’s Carnegie Hall on June 27 and San Francisco’s Warfield on June 25. Stop it, Neil. We love you enough already! [SF Chronicle]

On The Books: Harper Lee settles lawsuit against Alabama museum

Harper Lee settled her federal lawsuit against the Monroe County Heritage Museum in Monroeville, Alabama. As we reported in October, the reclusive author sued her hometown museum for selling souvenirs of To Kill A Mockingbird without compensating her. She was also embroiled in a lawsuit against her former literary agent last year over the copyright to her book. Those charges were dismissed after the parties reached an out of court settlement. [AP] [ABC News] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Murakami's new novel; plus, audiobooks with Neil Gaiman, Roald Dahl, Bill Bryson

Haruki Murakami’s new novel, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, will be published in the U.S. on August 12th. The book has been out in Japan since last April and sold more than a million copies in its first week. The Guardian writes that the story “hinges around Tsukuru Tazaki, an isolated 36-year-old man struggling to overcome the trauma of rejection by his high-school friends years earlier. Like its title, the novel’s opening line might not sound like obvious best-seller material: ‘From July of his sophomore year at college to January next year, Tsukuru Tazaki was living while mostly thinking about dying.'”

READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling's 'The Cuckoo's Calling' sequel announced

Now that we all know that Robert Galbraith is J.K. Rowling’s pseudonym, there’s no way the sequel to last year’s surprise best-seller The Cuckoo’s Calling will spend any time in obscurity. The Silkworm will debut in the U.K. on June 19 and in the U.S. on June 24. Here’s the official plot description from Mulholland Books: READ FULL STORY

BREAKING -- New Stephen King novel 'Revival' announced!

The brilliant mind of Stephen King is still churning out nightmares and twisted fantasies. The author just announced on his official website that he will be releasing Revival on November 11, 2014. He posted this description:

A dark and electrifying novel about addiction, fanaticism, and what might exist on the other side of life.

In a small New England town, over half a century ago, a shadow falls over a small boy playing with his toy soldiers. Jamie Morton looks up to see a striking man, the new minister. Charles Jacobs, along with his beautiful wife, will transform the local church. The men and boys are all a bit in love with Mrs. Jacobs; the women and girls feel the same about Reverend Jacobs—including Jamie’s mother and beloved sister, Claire. With Jamie, the Reverend shares a deeper bond based on a secret obsession. When tragedy strikes the Jacobs family, this charismatic preacher curses God, mocks all religious belief, and is banished from the shocked town.

Jamie has demons of his own. Wed to his guitar from the age of 13, he plays in bands across the country, living the nomadic lifestyle of bar-band rock and roll while fleeing from his family’s horrific loss. In his mid-thirties—addicted to heroin, stranded, desperate—Jamie meets Charles Jacobs again, with profound consequences for both men. Their bond becomes a pact beyond even the Devil’s devising, and Jamie discovers that ‘revival’ has many meanings.

This rich and disturbing novel spans five decades on its way to the most terrifying conclusion Stephen King has ever written. It’s a masterpiece from King, in the great American tradition of Frank Norris, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Edgar Allan Poe.

This will be King’s second novel for 2014. In June, he will be releasing a hard-boiled detective novel called  Mr. Mercedes, which will be a new frontier for the 66-year-old author. What are your thoughts on the new book?

On The Books: Jesse Eisenberg reviews restaurants like he's 9

Jesse Eisenberg, the fast-talking, nerdtastic actor from The Social Network who is Mark Zuckerberg as far as I’m concerned, will be publishing a collection of his short stories in 2015. Eisenberg has already written two plays, Asuncion and The Revisionist, the latter of which was performed on Broadway by Eisenberg and Vanessa Redgrave. This isn’t a James Franco situation where he’s trying to pass off his snapchats as performance art. Eisenberg is truly a talented writer. The story collection will included previously published pieces from The New Yorker and McSweeney’s, as well as new stuff. For a taste of his work, check out his column in McSweeney’s called “Bream Gives Me Hiccups: Restaurant Reviews from a Privileged Nine-Year-Old,” which is written from a little boy’s perspective as he’s dragged around Los Angeles by his mother who bills all their meals to her ex-husband. Hilarious and poignant. READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Tolkien almost cut love story from 'Lord of the Rings'

First it was Ron and Hermione, now Aragorn and Arwen?? A previously unpublished letter reveals the tricksy W.H. Auden tried to convince J.R.R. Tolkien to axe the romance between Aragorn and Arwen in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The illuminating letter is from 1955 and penned by Tolkien, who is complaining to his publisher about the struggle to complete The Return of the King. Tolkien laments that Auden views the star-crossed subplot between the mortal king and his immortal lover as “unnecessary and perfunctory.” Wow. Shoot me straight, Auden. How do you really feel? Apparently the poet was on Team Éowyn-Faramir. Considering the level of minutia that Tolkien weaves into the historical fabric of Middle Earth, you would think LOTR could support a number of love stories. If I know the second cousin, twice-removed of every dwarf in the Shire, I think I can follow two romantic subplots. I guess Auden was a purist though. One story of true love per series. It’s good to have standards. Thank God Tolkien didn’t take his advice. [The Guardian] READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Washington DC reads more than you do

You read that right. Apparently the nation’s capital is the most literate city in America for the fourth year in a row. News to me. I thought everyone in DC was on the phone with donors all day. The study was conducted by Central Connecticut State University, and it takes into account the number of bookstores, library resources, Internet use, educational levels and newspaper circulation of 77 of the largest cities in America. And coming in at 77th is Bakersfield, CA. Poor Bakersfield. They also took the gold medal in worst air quality in 2013. Let’s show them some love in 2014 please. [USA Today]

Today the Folio Society announced its shortlist of nominees for their inaugural Folio Prize, which honors English-language fiction from around the world that is published in the UK, regardless of form, genre or the author’s country of origin. The prize is £40,000 and a ticket to the “glittering ceremony at the St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel.” Sounds like luxury!  The authors in the running are Anne Carson, Amity Gaige, Jane Gardam, Kent Haruf, Rachel Kushner, Eimear McBride, Sergio De La Pava, and George Saunders. The biggest surprise is the heavy representation of Americans, who make up five of the eight nominees. Saunders was listed for his latest short-story collection Tenth of December. [Folio Prize]

Great news from Dreamworks this morning. The studio is opening a book publishing unit that will put out titles based on their animated films, like Madagascar and Kung Fu Panda. The books will be available in print and digital formats, which is great, but I hope that they offer audiobooks of Madagascar read by the lemurs. Or better yet, classics read by the lemurs. Tuck Everlasting would be so much easier to choke down if it were read by the lemurs. [Wall Street Journal]

Lena Dunham Instagrams the cover of her upcoming book


Even though Lena Dunham’s best known for chronicling the of-the-moment travails of twenty-somethings, she’s gone retro for the look of her first book, Not That Kind of Girl, for which she was reportedly paid in the neighborhood of $3.5 million. The Girls creator and star instagrammed a mockup of the cover and tweeted the release date, Oct. 7. It looks like she’s left her face — which has graced the covers of Entertainment Weekly, Vogue, and Rolling Stone — off the jacket, which calls to mind books from the ’60s and ’70s like Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann and The Women’s Room by Marilyn French.

Here’s the official description of Not That Kind of Girl from Dunham herself: READ FULL STORY

On The Books: Glee's Chris Colfer drops another book

Chris Colfer (the one who plays sassy Kurt on Glee) writes children’s books. Just to make you feel unproductive this Thursday, he already has two books under his belt and he’s only 23. In between filming Glee episodes, he’s found the time to write a third, The Land of Stories: A Grimm Warning. In between my heavy coffee-drinking, I found the time to author this post, so we’re all busy. Colfer just announced that the fantasy story will be released on July 8, and USA Today has an excerpt. Don’t all rush over there at once! [USA Today]

You know that feeling that you get when you are swept into a really good book, so lost in what the character is thinking that you can’t hear the subway conductor announce your stop and suddenly you’re in Queens again – and not at your office in Midtown? That’s never happened to me. But if you are this kind of engrossed reader, then imagine how much cooler cracking a book is going to be with a computerized vest that makes you feel like you are the protagonist. MIT developed a vest for readers to wear that can restrict your breathing when the main character is scared or change your body temperature to match a dank basement that the character is trapped in. Wait, that sounds terrible…This should come with a warning label that says: DO NOT use with a Stephen King novel. [NPR]

The script for Red Rising, a new science fiction/fantasy novel that was released last week, is already being tossed around in Hollywood. Deadline is reporting that Marc Forster, the director of World War Z, is attached to the potential film. We liked the book so much that we put it on the Must List last week, so snap up a copy if you’re interested in reading a gripping saga of a young boy trying to break out of the brutal caste system that he has been born into. Vengeance, war, love, and hate — all taking place on Mars. Sounds like a Valentine’s Day read! [Deadline]

Business Insider put together a list of the 18 bookstores every book-lover must visit. Some picks are classics: Book People in Austin, Shakespeare & Company in Paris. And some picks were less known gems: apparently the biggest outdoor bookstore in the world is in Ojai, CA. Then there’s John K. King Used And Rare Books in the industrial wasteland of Detroit, which looks like an episode of CSI waiting to happen. I won’t be rushing out to “get lost” in these book stacks. [Business Insider]

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