Shelf Life Book news, reviews, trends, and talk

Category: News (11-20 of 624)

On the Books: Authors United warns Amazon, watch your reputation

Amazon.jpg

The 1,100 member group Authors United posted a letter of direct appeal to Amazon’s board of directors—urging them to end their book-pricing standoff with publisher Hachette, which has hurt some authors’ book sales.

The letter warns the board that their reputation may be at stake: “[I]f this is how Amazon continues to treat the literary community, how long will the company’s fine reputation last?” The appeal continues, noting similar disputes “have a long and ugly history,” and asking, “Do you, personally, want to be associated with this?” For months, Amazon has delayed shipments of books by Hachette authors and removed the preorder option for those titles in an attempt to force Hachette to lower its e-book prices. [NPR] READ FULL STORY

Ursula Le Guin honored with National Book Foundation award

Every year, the National Book Foundation awards the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters to an author “who has enriched our literary heritage over a life of service, or a corpus of work.” Since the medal’s inception, authors spanning all genres have been honored, from David McCullough’s historical nonfiction to Ray Bradbury’s science fiction and everything in between.

This year, the foundation has awarded the medal to Ursula Le Guin, whose body of sci-fi and fantasy work spans dozens of novels, short stories, and poems.

READ FULL STORY

See inside the official 'Sons of Anarchy' book, and read the Tara chapter

Sons-of-Anarchy-Cover

As Sons of Anarchy fans rev up for the start of the final season (premiering Sept. 9 at 10 p.m. ET on FX), creator Kurt Sutter has revealed the cover of the show’s forthcoming companion book, Sons of Anarchy: The Official Collector’s Edition, for which he penned an introduction. It’ll hit shelves Dec. 10, the day after the FX drama’s series finale airs.

EW has an exclusive first look inside at the chapter on Tara (Maggie Siff), a map of SOA charters, the SAMCRO family tree, and more. Click on the images for a fuller size. READ FULL STORY

Usher and Scholastic join forces to promote young readers

The Scholastic catalogs you got in elementary school were already cool, but now Usher is joining forces with the children’s publishing giant to launch the “Open the World of Possible” initiative, which is designed to encourage young readers. On Nov. 6, Usher will perform and host a a live webcast, “Bigger Than Words,” which will broadcast live from the Scholastic headquarters in New York City.

“I established New Look, a charitable organization to assist young people to become leaders and to instill in them a belief that they can create change in their communities and around the world,” said Usher. “I’m excited to host the webcast with Scholastic to demonstrate to kids how reading frequently, and being a reading mentor to their friends and others in their community, can open doors to endless possibilities.”

As a further part of the initiative, the Scholastic Possible Fund will make a donation of 100,000 books, and each of three leading non-profits that distribute books to children who need them most will receive a portion of the donation.

Haruki Murakami's 'Strange Library' to arrive in December

Known for a large body of work including 1Q84 and Norwegian Wood, Japanese author Haruki Murakami is set to release an English-language translation of his story The Strange Library on Dec. 2. READ FULL STORY

Charlotte Bronte's 1824 school report card: 'Knows nothing of grammar'

Here’s some hopeful news if you were ever told by your teachers that you’d never amount to anything: In grade school, Charlotte Brontë’s teachers at the Clergy Daughters School said she “[wrote] indifferently” and “[knew] nothing of grammar, geography, history, or accomplishments.” Slate dug up the reports, which were reprinted in the January 1900 issue of The Journal of Education: A Monthly Record and Review.

Patrick Brontë sent his four oldest daughters to the school after his wife died. Three of them—Emily, Maria, and Elizabeth—didn’t exactly get positive feedback there. Emily Brontë got the most praise (which is still faint): “Reads very prettily,” her report read. According to the report, Maria Brontë (who died of an illness shortly after leaving the school) “made some progress in reading French, but knows nothing of the language grammatically.” Elizabeth Brontë, who also died young of an illness, “Knows nothing of grammar, geography, history, or accomplishments.”

Of course, Charlotte and Emily Brontë became feminist icons and two of England’s most renowned novelists, and Charlotte’s Jane Eyre and Emily’s Wuthering Heights are in the canon of British literature. Poor Anne Brontë, whose work is often overlooked in favor of her sisters’, didn’t even go to the same school.

David Levithan to release musical-novel spinoff to 'Will Grayson, Will Grayson'

Will-Grayson-Will-Grayson

Jazz hands at the ready!

Tiny Cooper, described as “the world’s largest person who is really, really gay,” stole our hearts when he debuted in Will Grayson, Will Grayson, the 2010 YA novel co-written by The Fault in Our Stars author John Green and Every Day author David Levithan. Four years later, Levithan is giving us a closer, more razzle-dazzle glimpse at the larger-than-life character with the full script of the musical Tiny was working on in Will Grayson. So meta!

Hold Me Closer: The Tiny Cooper Story (March 2015) will tell of Tiny’s birth up to his ongoing quest for true love, complete with “big, lively, belty” musical numbers. We talked to David Levithan about what exactly a “musical-novel, novel-musical” entails and how he pulled it off. READ FULL STORY

Lena Dunham's book tour features spectacular roster of guests

The hype for Lena Dunham’s first book Not That Kind of Girl might be even louder than we expected — this will be the bookstore equivalent of a Beyonce and Jay-Z stadium concert tour. Dunham announced the dates for Not That Kind of Tour today, and the lineup of special guests is absurdly amazing. Certain stops will feature local talent (you can apply to an open call on Dunham’s website), but others will feature well-known women, including fellow Apatow collaborator Amy Schumer, poet and memoirist Mary Karr, Portlandia star Carrie Brownstein, filmmaker Miranda July, and novelist Zadie Smith.

See below for a full list of stops for Not That Kind of Tour: READ FULL STORY

Comic-book icon Archie Andrews will die saving gay friend

In April, Archie Comics publisher and co-CEO Jon Goldwater told CNN that Archie Andrews would die in issue #36 of “Life with Archie,” a comic-book series set in an alternate universe that presented possible futures for the characters of the classic Archie Comics series. Issue #36 will arrive on stands on Wednesday—and while we don’t know yet who kills Archie, we do now know how he dies.

Today, Goldwater revealed to the Associated Press that Archie would die trying to stop an assassination attempt on Archie Comics’ first openly gay character, Kevin Keller, a military veteran and newly elected senator who’s in favor of increased gun control.

“We wanted to do something that was impactful that would really resonate with the world and bring home just how important Archie is to everyone,” Goldwater told the AP. “That’s how we came up with the storyline of saving Kevin. He could have saved Betty. He could have saved Veronica. We get that, but metaphorically, by saving Kevin, a new Riverdale is born.”

Issue #36 is the penultimate issue of “Life with Archie.” The following issue, #37, will jump ahead one year to depict how Betty, Veronica and the rest of the Riverdale gang are handling Archie’s death and honoring his legacy. Goldwater said that the way in which Archie dies is meant to “epitomize not only the best of Riverdale but the best of all of us,” and that he hopes that it works as “a lesson about gun violence and a declaration of diversity in the new age of Archie Comics.”

Burt Reynolds to publish memoir in 2015

“The story sucks them in,” is how Jack Horner explains the secret behind his productions in Boogie Nights. And now, the actor behind Jack Horner is ready to tell his story.

Burt Reynolds’ memoir, titled But Enough About Me, will be published in fall 2015 by G. P. Putnam’s Sons. Jon Winokur, who co-wrote The Garner Files with James Garner, will be co-writing the book with Reynolds. Jon Voight, who starred in Reynolds’ breakout film, 1972’s Deliverance, will be providing a foreword.

But Enough About Me will cover Reynold’s life from his childhood in South Florida through his six-decade career and courtships in Hollywood. We’re also going to hear his take on his famous nude spread in a 1972 Cosmopolitan centerfold, the two pages that made the publication infamous.

“Setting the record straight is something that I have wanted to do for a while now,” Reynolds said. “And with this book I will.”

Latest Videos in Books

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP