Shelf Life Book news, reviews, trends, and talk

Category: Music (21-30 of 40)

Gregg Allman talks life behind the scenes in new memoir, 'My Cross to Bear' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Nearly two decades ago, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers Band headlined sold-out concerts across the country. Behind the scenes, he was tussling with unsuccessful marriages to six different women including Cher, substance abuse, and a battle with hepatitis C. The result: the stories chronicled in My Cross to Bear (out May 1).

In the revealing memoir, the musician opens up about his rocky past, including the defining moments after he discovered the death of his older brother in a motorcycle accident. Allman recounts what it was like to lose his brother in this exclusive clip from the enhanced version of the e-book: READ FULL STORY

Carole King talks about her memoir 'A Natural Woman' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

carole-king-a-natural-woman

Iconic singer-songwriter Carole King has written a memoir, A Natural Woman, that’s as rich and soulful as one of her hit songs. In it, she writes about her teenage years, during which she wrote her first chart-topper “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” and takes the reader through her rise to celebrity and her four marriages, including her tumultuous creative and personal partnership with Gerry Goffin. Running through the entire narrative is King’s passionate love and deep knowledge of music, and given that King is an iconic singer-songwriter, the audiobook version, voiced by the author herself, might be the best way to experience her story — she takes frequent breaks from the narrative to break into a cappella renditions of her songs. Check out the clip below to see King sound off on the writing and narrating process. READ FULL STORY

'Glee' Official William McKinley High School Yearbook: See pages! -- EXCLUSIVE

GLEE-YEARBOOK-01

Cue up “Graduation (Friends Forever)” by Vitamin C (which the Glee kids will hopefully cover later this season to send off seniors Kurt, Rachel, and Finn) and flip through the Official William McKinley High School Yearbook! It may look like a regular yearbook on the outside, but apparently McKinley gossip columnist Jacob Ben Israel had full editorial control, since the theme is — not surprisingly — all glee club all the time. The book hits stores May 1 from Little, Brown, but in the meantime, EW has an exclusive peek at the cover, spreads on Rachel and Blaine, some fun “Most Likely To…” pages, a very helpful “Hookup Chart,” and more. Read on, and H.A.G.S.!

NEXT: Spotlight on Blaine Anderson…

Justin Bieber's mom to publish memoir

Pop star Justin Bieber’s mom has inked a book deal to tell the story of the role she played in her son’s rise to superstardom.

Pattie Mallette signed a deal with Revell Books to publish, “Nowhere But Up: The Story of Justin Bieber’s Mom.”

The book’s publisher said in a statement Tuesday that Mallette will share details of the trauma, abuse and addiction that plagued her early childhood and young adult years, leading to a suicide attempt when she was 17.

The Stratford, Ontario, native became pregnant at age 18 and gave birth to Bieber in 1994.

The book, written in collaboration with A.J. Gregory, will include a foreward by Bieber. It is slated for release Sept. 18.

Best of 2011: Top 10 Music Books

noise-in-my-head

All week long, Shelf Life is listing EW’s favorite books of 2011 — sorted into separate categories by genre. Click through the gallery to see our picks for the best music books of the year, starting Steven Tyler’s memoir.

Does The Noise in My Head Bother You?, Steven Tyler: From the EW review: “This book concludes with Tyler securing the Idol gig last year, but the singer recalls how, less than 12 months before, he accidentally ruptured a package of his cocaine in the New York apartment of his (absent) daughter Liv. Drug addicts of a waste-not-want-not disposition — which is to say, all drug addicts — will be glad to know that Tyler ‘snorted it all up, off the counters and everywhere, and got a nice f—ing rail out of it.'”

Chuck Eddy's 'Rock and Roll Always Forgets': 25 years of unique pop-music writing

I admit it: It took me a good 10 years to “get” Chuck Eddy. Reading his early pieces, mostly in The Village Voice, where music editor and ultra-talent-scout Robert Christgau showcased Eddy’s idiosyncratic ardencies (Montgomery Gentry? White Wizzard?) and a prose style that was conversational if your idea of conversation was being hectored by a good-natured obsessive, I was stumped. Eddy defeated my pride in being able to ignore the taste of a critic as long as he or she wrote well. His aesthetic seemed random, if not willfully, showily perverse.

But eventually – through sheer quality; through sheer quantity (as a once and future freelancer myself, I admire a man who churns out well-wrought sentences by the ream) – Eddy won me over. How glad I am to see the publication of Eddy’s new song(s) of himself Rock and Roll Always Forgets: A Quarter Century of Music Criticism (Duke University Press). Glad, first, because it’s truly a representative selection, tracing the slithery paths of Eddy’s enthusiasms from Marilyn Manson to Mindy McCready just to stick with the “M”s, with tart new intros that set up reprints of some of his greatest hits. And glad, second, that there exist publishers still willing to release anthologies of rock writing, since so much great rock criticism remains uncollected, neglected, less forgotten than never known to a wider audience. (Can we get a Tom Smucker book together, please? I’ll edit the damn thing myself.) READ FULL STORY

'Trust Me, I'm Dr. Ozzy': I read it so you don't have to!

We live in a world where Ozzy Osbourne, the “Prince of Darkness” himself, is now the author of not one but two books. His first book, the memoir I Am Ozzy, landed on the New York Times‘ best-seller list last year. And today his second work, Trust Me, I’m Dr. Ozzy: Advice from Rock’s Ultimate Survivor, hits shelves. And who knows? Maybe Dr. Ozzy will similarly find its way onto the best-seller list.

The idea for Dr. Ozzy stemmed from his gig as an advice columnist for The Sunday Times (a column also seen in select issues of Rolling Stone). The book, infused with his own personal stories, is mostly set up in a Q&A format where he answers a wide range of questions varying from sex to mental illness. And while he gives some surprisingly good advice at certain points, he acknowledges that he’s no expert: “I mean, unless the advice is how to end up dead or in jail, I’m not exactly qualified. I’m Ozzy Osbourne, not Oprah f—ing Winfrey.”

So I trudged through the 12-chapter book (so you don’t have to!) to pull out some of the more interesting points. And you can trust me on that. I’m NOT a doctor. Just like Ozzy Osbourne. READ FULL STORY

Amy Winehouse's father sells book to HarperCollins

Mitch Winehouse, the father of late singer Amy Winehouse, has sold the rights to a book about his daughter to HarperCollins, according to The Bookseller. The book is called Amy, My Daughter and will be published in the summer of next year. Proceeds will go to the Amy Winehouse Foundation, which supports charitable activities that offer support or care to young people. Amy Winehouse’s family set up the foundation following the death of the singer in July.

'Definitive' Courtney Love memoir and tell-all coming your way

An as-yet untitled memoir, which promises to be a “no holds barred” look into rock star and actress Courtney Love’s wild life, will be staggering your way in Fall 2012, according to a press release from William Morrow. Co-written by Anthony Bozza, the memoir will set the record straight on a number of topics, including Love’s tumultuous marriage to Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain, her drug use and recovery, relationship with daughter Frances Beane, and highly publicized affairs with Billy Corgan and Ed Norton.

Music journalist Fred Goodman presents candid picture of The Beatles, Rolling Stones manager Allen Klein in upcoming book -- EXCLUSIVE

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt has snapped up a new book from music journalist and author Fred Goodman. Tentatively titled The Price of an Education, it will be a look at the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and other iconic music acts from the perspective of their controversial manager, Allen Klein (Goodman will have exclusive access to Klein’s family, associates, and archives). Editor Eamon Dolan said in a statement, “Klein is an extremely sharp, fresh lens for viewing this era and these musicians. He was far more than an ingenious numbers guy; he had a huge ego and a cutting wit that made high drama out of all his dealings with Mick, Keith, John, Paul, and many more.”

Latest Videos in Books

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP