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Category: Movies (41-50 of 110)

Stephen King unearths origin of 'The Shining' sequel 'Doctor Sleep' -- EXCLUSIVE

A man never outlives his father.

That’s a line from William Faulkner, but it applies in earnest to Danny Torrance, the psychic little boy from Stephen King’s The Shining.

King is revisiting the now middle-aged Dan Torrance in the sequel Doctor Sleep (out Sept. 24) which finds him working at a hospice, where he uses his innate supernatural powers to ease the suffering of the dying. Dan may have survived his old man’s madness (and swinging mallet) in the hallways of that long-ago snowbound hotel, but he has grown up to realize that not all demons can be escaped. Some are a part of you.

In a wide-ranging interview with Entertainment Weekly, King reveals the origin story behind Doctor Sleep, talks about the fatherhood fears buried in The Shining, and speculates about what could become of his stories when he’s long, long gone …

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What we learned about Neil Gaiman's influences from his interview with NPR

When reading the wildly imaginative works of Neil Gaiman, one can’t help but wonder, “How does he think up this stuff?” The Coraline and American Gods author revealed a bit of what may be an answer to that question Monday when he chatted with Steve Inskeep on NPR’s Morning Edition.

The interview was part of the public radio station’s “Watch This” series, which has featured pop culture recommendations from the likes of Sherman Alexie, Kevin Smith and Lisa Kudrow. Read on for what Gaiman had to say about four favorites of his – and where EW can see these influences in his own works. READ FULL STORY

Read an excerpt from 'Warm Bodies' prequel 'The New Hunger' -- EXCLUSIVE

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Just before the film version of Isaac Marion’s alternately hilarious and gruesome novel Warm Bodies hits the big screen, Marion will give us another bloody taste of his zombie-infested world. The New Hunger, a prequel to Warm Bodies, will be released as an eBook Jan. 28 exclusively by Zola Books. It’ll give fans an intriguing look at brain-muncher-with-a-heart-of-gold R — played by Nicholas Hoult in the movie — before he fell in love with Julie (Teresa Palmer), who’s also featured in the prequel.

The New Hunger will take place soon after the natural disasters and government collapse that made Earth a crawling ground for hungry corpses. Separated from their parents, 16-year-old Nora and her younger brother Addis fight to escape zombies that are pursuing them. Meanwhile, R wakes up in the woods with no memory of who he is, and Julie is stuck on an odd road trip with her parents.

Before the publication date, EW has a sneak peek at The New Hunger. Check it out below: READ FULL STORY

'Star Wars' #2 comic: Han Solo and Chewie run afoul of Boba Fett -- EXCLUSIVE FIRST LOOK

The (first) Death Star has been destroyed. The Empire remains in dogged pursuit of the Rebel Alliance. And the only cause Han Solo still seems to care about is Han Solo.

Such is the landscape of Dark Horse Comics’ latest Star Wars series, written by Brian Wood, drawn by Carlos D’Anda, and set in the heady days between the first film (a.k.a. Star Wars, a.k.a. Star Wars: A New Hope, a.k.a. Star Wars: Episode IV — A New Hope) and the second film (a.k.a. The Empire Strikes Back, a.k.a….oh, you get the idea).  READ FULL STORY

Historian Jim Cullen discusses 'Sensing the Past: Hollywood Stars and Historical Visions'

Have you ever noticed strains of Jeffersonian populism in Dirty Harry? Or Lincoln’s institutional confidence in Big? Jim Cullen has.

Cullen, a former Harvard professor who currently helms the History Department at the Fieldston School in New York City, sees historical undercurrents in a lot of films. So many, in fact, that he’s written a book on the subject. Sensing the Past: Hollywood Stars and Historical Visions explores American history as seen through the lenses of six A-list stars: Clint Eastwood, Daniel Day-Lewis, Meryl Streep, Denzel Washington, Tom Hanks, and Jodie Foster. He even assigns each actor a historical counterpart – in Eastwood’s case, it’s Thomas Jefferson; for Meryl Streep, it’s pioneering feminist Betty Friedan. Cullen looks at each actor’s career and explains how their choices of roles reveal their individual notions of history, and how those notions align with those of their analogues. Daniel Day-Lewis, for example, is the consummate champion of the frontier.

EW spoke with Cullen about the book and the inspiration behind it. Read the edited interview after the jump:

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Gayle Forman on the 'Just One Day' read-a-thon and the movie version of 'If I Stay'

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Just three days ago, Gayle Forman’s newest YA novel, Just One Day, hit shelves. In honor of the book’s release, Penguin Teen is hosting a 24-hour read-a-thon on Twitter. Starting today at 5 p.m. ET to tomorrow at 5 p.m., fans are encouraged to read the book and Tweet about their progress with the hashtag #JustOneDay. Then from 7–8 p.m., Forman will participate in a chat and answer questions about Just One Day and the upcoming sequel, Just Another Year. After the jump, Forman teases the special promotion and offers up a juicy casting tidbit about the film adaptation of her book, If I StayREAD FULL STORY

If you find Dennis Lehane's lost dog, he'll name a character after you in his new book

The bad news: Novelist/screenwriter Dennis Lehane’s beloved dog has gone missing.

The good news: If you find her, the author of Mystic River and Shutter Island will name a character after you in his next book. There’s no guarantee that character will be sane and/or safe from a grisly death, though.

Lehane posted his unusual offer on Facebook Tuesday, explaining that the pooch — a black-and-tan beagle who answers to the name ‘Tessa’ — had jumped the fence at his Brookline, Mass. home 24 hours previously. “She’s smart, fast, and immeasurably sweet,” the Edgar Award winner wrote. “She doesn’t have a mean bone in her body. She’s micro-chipped, but her tags were off when she was let out into the yard.

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Geek Deep Dive: Writing the 'Star Trek' history book, 'Federation: The First 150 Years'

In my half-dozen years at Entertainment Weekly, I have never received an object as deliciously deep-dish geeky as David A. Goodman’s Federation: The First 150 Years. (Sorry, two-volume, 12 pound graphic novelization of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower. You had a really good run there.)

As any Trekkie has likely ascertained already, Federation (out now) is a history of Star Trek‘s United Federation of Planets — the grand interstellar organization at the heart of Gene Roddenberry’s wagon train to the stars — written as if it really happened, from life on a war-ravaged Earth in the 1990s through the death of James T. Kirk. The book comes with translated historical documents, rare archival artifacts, and a light-up pedestal that features the voice of George Takei as Admiral Hikaru Sulu, commander-and-chief of Starfleet, introducing the reader to the tome before them.

Like I said: Deep. Dish. Geeky. READ FULL STORY

Hear a clip and read an excerpt from Chris Colfer's 'Struck by Lightning: The Carson Phillips Journal" -- EXCLUSIVE

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Chris Colfer is a busy man. Between making movies and playing Kurt Hummel on Glee, it’s a wonder he’s found any time at all to pursue a writing career. And yet, the 22-year-old is getting ready to release his second novel of the year next week.

Struck by Lightning: The Carson Phillips Journal follows Carson Phillips, a high school outcast who blackmails his peers into participating in his literary magazine. It’s already been filmed as a movie starring Christina Hendricks, Rebel Wilson and Colfer himself. Though the film won’t be out until next year, the book hits shelves on Nov. 20. Colfer took the time to talk to EW about his first young adult novel, his own high school experiences and that one time he dabbled in extortion himself. Read the interview below and check out an exclusive print excerpt and audio clip from Struck by Lightning: The Carson Phillips Journal afterwards!

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First Look: Cassandra Clare's 'Mortal Instruments' movie

Fans have to wait until Aug. 23 for the big-screen debut of Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, the film adaptation of the first book in Cassandra Clare’s popular YA series. But the exclusive first look at heroine Clary Fray (Lily Collins) has arrived early. READ FULL STORY

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