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Category: Books (71-80 of 2061)

Cassandra Clare and co. to launch Shadowhunter e-series

Shadow-Hunter

The Mortal Instruments series may have come to an epic conclusion earlier this year, but author Cassandra Clare is far from done telling Shadowhunter tales. Case in point: EW has learned that Clare will partner with bestselling authors Sarah Rees Brennan, Robin Wasserman, and Maureen Johnson for a new series of e-novellas titled Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy.

The series will launch with one story a month beginning in February, in the same vein as Clare’s Bane Chronicles. (The Bane Chronicles, co-written by Brennan and Johnson, will publish a special print edition next month.) READ FULL STORY

2014 National Book Award finalists announced

ROZ-CHAST

This morning on NPR’s Morning Edition, the National Book Foundation announced the 20 finalists for the National Book Awards in four categories.

The Fiction shortlist includes Anthony Doerr’s best-seller All the Light We Cannot See, Phil Klay’s debut collection of wartime short stories, and Emily St. John Mandel’s breakout post-apocalyptic novel Station Eleven. The Nonfiction list is most notable for its inclusion of Roz Chast for her graphic memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?—Chast is the first cartoonist nominated in an adult category.

See below for a full list of finalists in all categories. READ FULL STORY

Australian author Richard Flanagan wins the Man Booker Prize

Australian author Richard Flanagan has won the Man Booker Prize for The Narrow Road to the Deep North—plus the £50,000 (about $80,000) prize and the great prestige that come with it.

Flanagan, born in Tasmania and living in Australia, is the third Aussie to win the award, which he received at a ceremony on Tuesday in London. The judges described his sixth book, published by Chatto & Windus, as “a harrowing account of the cost of war to all who are caught up in it.” Set in World War II, The Narrow Road tells the story of a surgeon in a Japanese POW camp along the Thailand-Burma Death Railway. The novel was partly inspired by Flanagan’s father’s experiences as a Japanese POW—he died at age 98 on the day his son finished the book.

“The two great themes from the origin of literature are love and war: this is a magnificent novel of love and war,” said chair of the judges A.C. Grayling. “Written in prose of extraordinary elegance and force, it bridges East and West, past and present, with a story of guilt and heroism.”

Flanagan’s win carries a special historical significance because this year marked the first time ever that the competition was open to writers from any country, as long as their work was published in English in the U.K. (Previously, only citizens of the U.K. Commonwealth, Ireland or Zimbabwe were eligible.) Brits still nabbed half of the spots on September’s shortlist, and British author Neel Mukherjee was the favorite to win for The Lives Of Others, set in 1960s India.

Flanagan is as surprised as anyone else by his win. “In Australia, the Man Booker is sometimes seen as something of a chicken raffle,” Flanagan said. “I just didn’t expect to end up the chicken.”

 

 

See the trailer for 'Breaking Bad' parody cookbook 'Baking Bad'

Baking-Bad

Are you the one who bakes?

Drugs and sweet snacks have a long history together, so of course it’s about time there was a Breaking Bad parody cookbook that offers up recipes for Walter Wheat’s specialties—including “Buried Barrel Dessert,” “Heisen(Batten) Burg Cake” (yes, there’s an edible black hat), and “Box Cutter Doughnuts.” Load up on your blue rock candy, go easy on the chili P., and watch the exclusive trailer below to get ready for Baking Bad: A Parody in a Cookbook, available on Oct. 28. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Lemony Snicket releases new web series

In September, Lemony Snicket released Shouldn’t You Be In School?, the third installment in the Series of Unfortunate Events prequel series All the Wrong Questions. To promote the series, Snicket has uploaded 34 interactive “You Choose the Mystery” videos to YouTube. Done in a faux-’50s mystery style, the goofy videos let viewers—you guessed it—choose their own mysteries via clickable options in the video. They’re silly.

Snicket, of course, is the pen name of Daniel Handler, who will release his next novel for adults, We Are Pirates, on Feb. 3, 2015. [Mediabistro]

Another popular children’s writer, Jeff Kinney, is quickly approaching a milestone. The next Diary of a Wimpy Kid book, The Long Haul, hits shelves Nov. 4, and its first printing will carry the series’ total sales past the 150 million-copy mark. That a decidedly unwimpy figure. [Publishers Weekly]

One of Kinney and Snicket’s forebears, Zilpha Keatley Snyder, died last week in San Francisco. The author specialized in books for preteen readers, often writing creepy tales about witchcraft and murder. She wrote nearly 50 books, which often combined realism and the supernatural for ambiguous endings. She was 87. [The New York Times]

China is cracking down on authors in a response to recent unrest in Hong Kong. To stifle pro-democracy protesters, the Chinese government has banned books by eight writers, including Taiwanese writer and director Giddens Ko and Chinese-American historian Yu Ying-shih. The government also detained a scholar, Guo Yushan, who helped activist Chen Guangcheng escape house arrest in 2012. [NPR]

Marvel confirms end of 'Fantastic Four' comic book series

Recent rumors have suggested Marvel’s First Family would be seeing an end in comic book form, and the publisher confirmed those suspicions during a panel at New York Comic Con this weekend.

READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Amazon reportedly opening its first brick-and-mortar store

Amazon.jpg

- Amazon is coming to Midtown. The The Wall Street Journal reports that the online giant is set to open its first brick-and-mortar store at 7 W. 34th St. in Manhattan, directly across the street from the Empire State Building. Herald Square, Madison Square Garden, Penn Station—major hubs for locals and tourists alike—are all a block or two away from the retailer-savvy location. In addition to the nearby stores (like the Macy’s flagship location, Forever 21, and H&M)—as well as a smartly timed opening just in time for the holiday shopping season—Amazon’s first serious venture into face-to-face consumer interaction is poised to bring in a lot of foot traffic. (They experimented with a popup Kindle shop in San Francisco last year.) In August, a peak number of about 6,000 people per hour passed in front of the H&M on the same block. Amazon has declined to comment on the story. [The Wall Street Journal]

- Girls actress and creator Lena Dunham is the kind of girl to top bestsellers lists with her debut book. Dunham’s collection of personal essays, is currently second on The New York Times bestsellers list for nonfiction, print and ebook sales combined—and No. 1 on the ebook-only nonfiction list. The book sold about 38,000 hardcovers in the week following its release on Sept. 30, according to Nielsen Bookscan (whose data covers approximately 85 percent of all book sales). READ FULL STORY

Here's how Gillian Flynn defended the ending of 'Gone Girl' in 2012

Giant spoilers ahead. Do not read on if you have not read or seen Gone Girl and you’d like to do one or both at some point.

While Gone Girl was becoming a major word-of-mouth hit a couple of years ago, the selling point was the giant twist halfway through. But a recommendation of the Gone Girl would also come with a warning about the ending, which was highly divisive, even among people who liked the book—just look at any online review.

Then earlier this year, in an interview with EW about the movie adaptation, director David Fincher said, “Ben [Affleck] was so shocked by it. He would say, ‘This is a whole new third act! [Gillian Flynn] literally threw that third act out and started from scratch.’” Other blogs ran with the quote, wrongly implying that Gone Girl author and screenwriter Gillian Flynn had caved to the negative response to the ending and changed it for the film. As it turns out, the third act was indeed structured differently for the film, but the ending—the one that infuriated or thrilled so many readers—was exactly the same.

EW talked to Flynn, a former EW writer, about that ending back in 2012: Amy, the sociopathic mastermind played by Rosamund Pike in the film, fakes her own death, ruins her husband’s life, and pretty much gets away with it. Read on for Flynn’s explanation as to why Gone Girl‘s ending is the only one that would have worked. READ FULL STORY

On the Books: Salman Rushdie shares PEN prize with Syrian activist Mazen Darwish

- Author Salman Rushdie is sharing his PEN Pinter prize with Syrian journalist, lawyer, and human rights activist Mazen Darwish. Darwish has been imprisoned in Syria since February 2012, where he is currently awaiting trial on charges of publicizing terrorist acts, according to English PEN. The founder of the Syrian Centre for Media and Freedom of Expression could face up to 15 years in prison if convicted. “Darwish courageously fought for civilised values—free expression, human rights—in one of the most dangerous places in the world,” said Rushdie, speaking at last night’s ceremony at the British Library in London. “His continued detention is arbitrary and unjust. He should be freed immediately, and we must hope this award may help, by shining a light on his plight.”

English PEN, a British free speech organization, established the joint prize five years ago in the name of Nobel Prize-winning British playwright Harold Pinter, who died of cancer in 2008. Half of the prize is awarded to a British author whose work helps defend freedom of speech and justice. Rushdie was selected for his “many years of speaking out for freedom of expression,” according to judges chair Maureen Freely. “When he sees writers unjustly vilified, prosecuted or forced into exile, he takes a personal interest.” The other half of the prize goes to an international writer who has been persecuted for doing similar work. [The Guardian] READ FULL STORY

Haruki Murakami didn't win the Nobel -- but these books prove why he deserves it

The Nobel oddsmakers were wrong—again!

Year after year, bookies put their bets on Japanese author Haruki Murakami winning the Nobel Prize in Literature. Instead, the Swedish Academy announced this morning that the honor had gone to French author Patrick Modiano.

2014 was feeling like Murakami’s time: His 13th novel Colorless Tsukuru and His Years of Pilgrimmage hit shelves in the U.S., and his fourth book of short stories, Men Without Women, has been announced. Earlier this week, The New Yorker ran his short story “Scheherazade.” It’s almost as if the Murakami machine—although not the notoriously fame-indifferent author himself—had been subtly campaigning for the win.

But even though Murakami still isn’t a Nobel Laureate, he’s written numerous works that demand to be read (or binged). The 65-year-old author has been writing four hours a day without fail for around 35 years—that’s a lot of lit to go through—so we’ve narrowed down his output to four essential novels that are perfect gateways for newbies: READ FULL STORY

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