More Potter on Pottermore! 'History of Quidditch' Part 2 now available!

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Image Credit: Peter Mountain

More Potter! More Potter! Fridays are so much better with Harry Potter stories. The second installment of The History of the Quidditch World Cup, the follow up to last week’s story on Pottermore, has gone up online today. This section covers “amusing recaps of some notable recent matches that have been held every four years since 1990.” Let’s get a Kickstarter campaign together to beg J.K. Rowling to release chapters from the wizard-verse every week. I know that she already has all the money she could want, but there must be something we could offer her as encouragement…any ideas?

In other book news, the author and journalist Khushwant Singh passed away at age 99. The Guardian says that “he held a particular place in Indian life as a critic of the establishment and a challenger of hypocrisy.” His mosaic ethnic background helped make him a keen observer of India’s modern history, especially its violent division into Muslim and Hindu countries: “Though his mother tongue was Punjabi and his cultural language was Urdu – he loved the Urdu poets and knew the Persian script – he chose to write in English, and soaked himself in Punjabi, Urdu and English and other European literature. Intellectually independent, he never took himself too seriously, and despite his Sikh background was an unrepentant agnostic. He made quite a success out of poking fun at pomposity, self‑righteousness, religiosity and his country’s myriad gods.”

Sounds like we could all take a page from his book. Speaking of ripping out pages, a publisher of Immanuel Kant’s essays on reason and judgement placed a “political correction” notice on its version of Kant’s Critiques. It reads: “This book is a product of its time and does not reflect the same values as it would if it were written today. Parents might wish to discuss with their children how views on race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and interpersonal relations have changed since this book was written before allowing them to read this classic work.” Since when do we need to add a caveat to one of the western world’s greatest philosophers? [Open Culture]

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